5 Amazing Health Benefits of Eggplant You May Have Not Heard Before

Commonly known as aubergine in England and brinjalin India, eggplant is a glossy, teardrop-shaped vegetable belonging to the nightshade botanical family. It is the same purple variety found across the globe but is referred to as an eggplant mostly in the United States. The eggplant is native to a number of countries stretching from India to Burma and extending to China.

While the eggplant is assumed to be a vegetable, it is actually a fruit that is cooked as a vegetable or a savoury dish. Thus biologically, it can be termed as a fruit and in terms of cooking it is used a vegetable. With a slightly bitter and acidic taste which may not be preferred by many, it is essential to consider the impressive health benefits that eggplant offers.

It is packed with vitamins like vitamin C, K and B6 and an ample amount of potassium, manganese and fiber. Even the leaves and roots of the plant are widely used for treating various infections and to heal wounds. Bangalore-based Nutritionist Dr. Anju Sood suggests several benefits that come along with eggplants that no one told you yet.

5 Amazing Health Benefits of Eggplant You May Have Not Heard Before

1. Heart friendly: A pigment present in eggplant known as anthocyanins helps strengthen the functioning of the heart. It also help to bring down the “bad” cholesterol and acts as a powerful antioxidant.

heartPhoto Credit: Istock

2. Acts as a natural laxative: Rich in fiber, eggplants improve the functions of the digestive system by acting as a natural laxative. It provides fiber, in addition to water and antioxidants which can prevent the risk of inflammation in the digestive system and also helps in relieving constipation.

indigestionPhoto Credit: Istock

3. Weight loss: Saponin in the eggplant prevents fat accumulation and absorption in the body and thus, aids the process of losing weight. While its nutrient content is extremely high, eggplant low on carbohydrates and calories and can easily fit into your weight loss diet.

weight loss measuresPhoto Credit: Istock

4. Rich in antioxidants: Anthocyanins that impart the deep purple colour to eggplants help in fighting free radicals in the body preventing the growth of cancer cells as well as other disease causing bacteria.

 

5. Helps prevent anemia: A rich source of iron, eggplants increase the production of red blood cells in the body and thus help fight anemia or iron deficiency which is common in females.

 

Now that you know all the health benefits of eating eggplants regularly, don’t shy away from this wonderful vegetable. There are several ways in which they can be made appealing and easier to consume for those who detest eating them. For instance, adding it to a simple sandwich or a whole grain burger does wonders. You can toss them with pasta or bake with cheese and other vegetables. Smokey, roasted eggplants are lovely with some light sauce. These are just few options to get you going.

BBAU varsity VC did not deal sensitively with sexual harassment case: Scheduled Caste Commission

The National Commission for Scheduled Castes (NCSC) has said that Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University (BBAU), RC Sobti, “lacked sensitivity” when dealing with a case of sexual harassment filed by a woman scheduled caste official.

It said recently that the vice chancellor “lacked maturity” while handling the complaint of BBAU’s woman registrar, a Dalit.

NCSC made these observations after the registrar, Sunita Chandra, moved a petition with the commission, drawing its attention to the sexual harassment she alleged she faced on campus.

Earlier, NCSC had pointed to flaws in the reservation roster for appointment of teachers at BBAU.

The BBAU registrar  has moved a petition with the National Scheduled Castes Commission Sunita Chandra, drawing its attention to the sexual harassment she alleged she faced on campus.

The commission found that vacancies in the reservation rosters, submitted by VC Sobti ‘prima facie’, were not in accordance with the prescribed format of the department of personnel and training (DoPT).

In its report, the commission said Sobti could not explain how the posts were de-reserved if SC candidates had applied for the posts but the selection process was not completed.

“It became apparent that discrepancy arises as the BBAU does not codify the posts as is done in other institutions,” the NCSC report said. When universities advertise vacancies they have to give a code for a particular post.

The commission had summoned Sobti and registrar Sunita Chandra on July 6 to explain allegations of reservation policies not being implemented properly to appoint teachers.

There were complaints of irregular recruitment in the university and ‘unfair’ treatment of students, teachers and employees belonging to the SC category.

To look into the anomalies, the commission has formed a three-member committee, headed by RC Durga as chairman and two others, RD Chandrahas and Tarun Khanna. The committee was asked to give its report within a month to the commission.

MSBSHSE new evaluation pattern: Class IX students will not have oral tests in languages

Class IX students will no longer have to take oral examinations in languages and write internal assessments in social sciences, according to the new evaluation pattern announced by the Maharashtra State Board of Secondary and Higher Secondary Education (MSBSHSE).

In a circular issued on Thursday, the MSBSHSE announced the new evaluation pattern for Class IX students as per the new curriculum.

The circular states that students will have to attempt a theory examination for all three languages and social sciences for 100 marks. Currently, the subjects have 20 marks allotted to orals/assignments and 80 marks for theory.

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“Oral exams for languages and the 20 marks-assignments in social sciences have been scrapped. We came across instances of schools inflating internal marks for their students to increase their overall score. The move is aimed to stop this practice,” said an official from the education department.

The new pattern would come into effect from the 2017-18 academic year.

The official said that from the next academic year, the same marking pattern will be implemented for Class X.

Big change:Babus, not academicians, to oversee education in Punjab

The Punjab School Education Board (PSEB) has decided to make structural changes in its set-up, by appointing bureaucrats instead of academicians in top positions.

The decision was taken in a meeting of the board held on Friday.

Until now, academicians were appointed in the administrative posts such as secretary. Now, the government will appoint IAS and PCS officers. At present, Janak Raj Mehrok is holding the position of secretary in the PSEB.

Among other decisions, the board has finally chosen to hand over the eleven Adarsh Schools under it to the government, would “bear their complete liability”.

The decision was taken in a meeting of the board held here on Friday.

Sources said the board ends up spending around Rs 35 crore on Adarsh Schools, which earned a revenue of Rs 1.5 crore only. The eleven adarsh schools under the board are located in five districts of Bathinda, Muktsar, Faridkot, Amritsar and Nawanshahr.

Meanwhile, the board has decided not to publish books for optional or additional subjects. The syllabus material of these books will be uploaded online for the students.

The board will make the art and craft classrooms in all schools, which were earlier supposed to be made under Rashtriya Madhyamik Shiksha Abhiyan (RMSA).

TN to appeal against Madras HC order to not reserve MBBS, BDS seats for state board students

Chennai The Tamil Nadu government will appeal against Friday’s Madras High Court’s (HC) decision to quash the Tamil Nadu government order to reserve 85% medical (MBBS) and dental (BDS) seats in undergraduate colleges for state board students. The admissions are being done on the basis of scores of a common entrance test, National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET).

State health minister C Vijayabaskar said the government would appeal against the single judge order . His government was opposed to NEET to protect the interests of the students from Tamil Nadu and that was why reservation was notified. “We are still against NEET and our bills are awaiting assent of the President,” he said.

The state government had through a notification rolled out the reservations last month. A mention of the same was made in the brochures issued for admissions to various undergraduate medical courses in state colleges.

The Madras High Court has reportedly quashed a Tamil Nadu government order reserving 85% of MBBS and BDS seats for state board students

Disposing of a petition challenging the June 22 notification of the state government filed by a minor, C Darnish Kumar, a CBSE student, Justice K Ravichandra Babu directed the medical colleges to consider the petitioner for all the seats available for undergraduate courses in medicine in the state for the academic year 2017-18.

The petitioner had challenged the notification saying that only the Medical Council of India (MCI) had the power to regulate medical college admissions as per the provisions of the Indian Medical Council Act. The MCI had stipulated that admissions to medical courses would be based on the marks obtained in NEET and merit lists prepared on the basis of such marks and that it did not distinguish between students from CBSE and the state board.

Justice Ravichandra Babu held that the impugned reservation was bad in law and violated Art 14 of the Constitution (Equality before law). He also held that the reservation indirectly meddled with the object and process of the NEET and compromised on merits of selection.

The judge directed authorities to prepare a fresh merit list and conduct the counselling for admissions accordingly.

The state government has not been in favour of NEET. It had submitted to the court that two of its bills, passed in the state assembly exempting students from NEET, were pending with the President for assent. The advocate general (AG) of Tamil Nadu also told the HC that 88,431 students appeared for NEET, out of which only 4,675 were from CBSE. “Since NEET is the basis of admission, to ensure fair and equal opportunity to candidates from different boards, such reservation is provided in the seats available in the State quota,” the AG said.

Justice Reddy refused to accept the state government pleas and quashed the notification providing for reservations to Tamil Nadu board students in medical college undergraduate courses.

Here's why you should not throw away lemon peels

Lemons not only taste delicious but also work wonder for your health, skin and hair. But if you are in the practice of throwing away lemon peel after squeezing the juice out of it, think again. Did you know lemon peel contains 5 to 10 times more vitamins than lemon itself?

Lemon peel contains a list of vitamin, mineral and fibre like calcium, potassium and Vitamin C, which gives your body a nutritional boost. Lemon peels also have some healthy enzymes, which help us to live a healthier life. So, by throwing away the lemon peel, you are doing a great disservice to your body.

Below are some of the most important benefits of lemon peels and the ways in which you can include them in your diet.

​Cancer prevention

​Cancer prevention

It’s surprising but lemon peels are used in prevention and treatment of cancer. It contains salvestrol Q40 and limonene, which helps in fighting the cancer cells. A study found that consumption of lemon peels in tea prevented the growth of cancer cells. Also, cancer thrives in an acidic body and lemon peel being alkaline in nature helps to maintain the pH of our body. Lemons are also anti-microbial, thus, ward off bacterial and fungal infection. Their low pH also make them perfect for beauty and personal care, and when applied directly to skin, lemon peel can lighten sun spots.

​Bone heath

​Bone heath

Lemon peel contain high amounts of Vitamin C and calcium and thus helps in improving and maintaining bone health. It also helps in preventing bone related diseases like inflammatory polyarthritis, osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

​Oral health

​Oral health

Vitamin C deficiency can result in teeth related problems like scurvy, bleeding gums and gingivitis. Lemon peels are rich in citric acid, which helps in covering up for deficiency of Vitamin C and thus help to fight common teeth related problem.

​Weight loss

Weight loss

Lemon peels promote weight loss. They are able to do so because of a component called pectin present in them. Pectin is responsible for the promotion of weight loss in the body.

​Treats oxidative stress

​Treats oxidative stress

Lemon peels have high amounts of citrus bio flavonoids, which are a good source for reduction of oxidative stress in your body.

​Reduces cholesterol and prevents heart related condition

Reduces cholesterol and prevents heart related condition

Due to the presence of polyphenol flavonoids in lemon peel, it is helpful in maintaining the cholesterol level in our body. The presence of potassium in lemon peels helps to maintain the blood pressure. In addition to all this, lemon peels also help in preventing heart diseases like stroke and heart attack by maintaining the cholesterol level.

​Fights skin related problems

​Fights skin related problems

Lemon peel is very helpful in fighting and preventing skin problems like acne, wrinkles, dark spots and pigmentation. Lemon peel is also rich in antioxidants and thus helps to detoxify our skin.

​Boosts immunity and digestion

​Boosts immunity and digestion

The presence of dietary fibre in it encourages healthy digestion by regulating the bowel movement. Vitamin C helps the body fight infections.

​Strengthens the blood vessel

​Strengthens the blood vessel

The presence of Vitamin P in lemon prevents internal haemorrhage, also making it useful for treating high blood pressure.

Nutrients in 1 serving (6 grams) of lemon peel:

Nutrients in 1 serving (6 grams) of lemon peel:
 

​How to consume lemon peel:

​How to consume lemon peel:

Deep freeze the lemon peel for a couple of hours. Grate them. You can sprinkle this grated peel in your drinks or food. You can also do this without freeing the lemons.

How to consume lemon peel

How to consume lemon peel

Grated lemon can also be added to the tea.

Lemon seasoning

Lemon seasoning
 

Dry the lemon peel in a oven at 200-degree temperature. Add whole pepper corn and coarse sea salt and grind this mixture. The seasoning for your dinner is ready.

How to consume lemon peel

How to consume lemon peel
 

Dry the lemon peels and then grind them completely making a fine powder. Now you can store this powder and use it as your home-made anti-ageing facial toner.

​Prevents fruits from turning brown

​Prevents fruits from turning brown
 

Add lemon peel to water and put the cut fruits in it. You can keep this in the fridge as long as needed. This water will prevent the browning of fruits.

 

TN to appeal against Madras HC order to not reserve MBBS, BDS seats for state board students

Chennai The Tamil Nadu government will appeal against Friday’s Madras High Court’s (HC) decision to quash the Tamil Nadu government order to reserve 85% medical (MBBS) and dental (BDS) seats in undergraduate colleges for state board students. The admissions are being done on the basis of scores of a common entrance test, National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET).

State health minister C Vijayabaskar said the government would appeal against the single judge order . His government was opposed to NEET to protect the interests of the students from Tamil Nadu and that was why reservation was notified. “We are still against NEET and our bills are awaiting assent of the President,” he said.

The state government had through a notification rolled out the reservations last month. A mention of the same was made in the brochures issued for admissions to various undergraduate medical courses in state colleges.

Disposing of a petition challenging the June 22 notification of the state government filed by a minor, C Darnish Kumar, a CBSE student, Justice K Ravichandra Babu directed the medical colleges to consider the petitioner for all the seats available for undergraduate courses in medicine in the state for the academic year 2017-18.

The petitioner had challenged the notification saying that only the Medical Council of India (MCI) had the power to regulate medical college admissions as per the provisions of the Indian Medical Council Act. The MCI had stipulated that admissions to medical courses would be based on the marks obtained in NEET and merit lists prepared on the basis of such marks and that it did not distinguish between students from CBSE and the state board.

The Madras High Court has reportedly quashed a Tamil Nadu government order reserving 85% of MBBS and BDS seats for state board students

Justice Ravichandra Babu held that the impugned reservation was bad in law and violated Art 14 of the Constitution (Equality before law). He also held that the reservation indirectly meddled with the object and process of the NEET and compromised on merits of selection.

The judge directed authorities to prepare a fresh merit list and conduct the counselling for admissions accordingly.

The state government has not been in favour of NEET. It had submitted to the court that two of its bills, passed in the state assembly exempting students from NEET, were pending with the President for assent. The advocate general (AG) of Tamil Nadu also told the HC that 88,431 students appeared for NEET, out of which only 4,675 were from CBSE. “Since NEET is the basis of admission, to ensure fair and equal opportunity to candidates from different boards, such reservation is provided in the seats available in the State quota,” the AG said.

Justice Reddy refused to accept the state government pleas and quashed the notification providing for reservations to Tamil Nadu board students in medical college undergraduate courses.

 

Norms not followed in teacher appointments at Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University: Scheduled Caste Commission

Lucknow: The National Commission for Scheduled Castes (NCSC) has pointed to flaws in the reservation roster for appointment of teachers at Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University here.

The commission found that vacancies in the reservation rosters, submitted by BBAU vice chancellor RC Sobti ‘prima facie’, were not in accordance with the prescribed format of the department of personnel and training (DoPT).

In its report, the commission said the vice chancellor could not explain how the posts were de-reserved if Scheduled Caste (SC) candidates had applied for the posts but the selection process was not completed.

“It became apparent that discrepancy arises as the BBAU does not codify the posts as is done in other institutions,” the NCSC report said. When universities advertise vacancies they have to give a code for a particular post.

“Separate rosters were not prepared for each cadre in the format prescribed in the DoPT)… rosters were not closed for each recruitment year,” the commission observed.

The commission summoned Sobti and registrar Sunita Chandra on July 6 to explain allegations of reservation policies not being implemented properly to appoint teachers. There were complaints of irregular recruitment in the university and ‘unfair’ treatment of students, teachers and employees belonging to the SC category.

Chairman NCSC, Prof RS Katheria, had sought explanations from the university authorities for alleged irregularities in appointments and non-implementation of the roster policy on campus.

To look into the anomalies, the commission has formed a three-member committee, headed by RC Durga as chairman and two others, RD Chandrahas and Tarun Khanna. The committee was asked to give its report within a month to the commission.

Sobti was asked to ensure that the committee was given assistance and access to all records. Registrar Sunita Chandra was made convenor, and not member of the committee, to assist in presenting records.

The registrar is the custodian of all records as per statutes. The BBAU was advised to codify all the posts, when advertised in future, for complete transparency.

The commission observed that registrar Sunita Chandra and VC RC Sobti were at cross purposes. It also mentioned that when the registrar had pointed out that rules were ignored in the roster preparation, she was sidelined and her statutory duties allocated to others.

The statutory powers of the registar cannot be exercised by anyone else when the registrar is in station, the commission said. The high court has also restored the registrar’s functioning. The next date of hearing is July 27.

Chairman NCSC, Prof RS Katheria, had sought explanations from the university authorities for the alleged irregularities in appointments and non-implementation of the roster policy on campus.

The NCSC chairman had summoned the university authorities after Sadhvi Savitri Bai Phule, member of parliament (MP) from Bahraich, had complained about irregularities in appointments.

 

Men may not need immediate surgery after being detected with prostate cancer

It’s a common belief that cancer needs to be treated as soon as possible. But that’s not necessarily the case with prostate tumour. Men increasingly have choices if their cancer is found at an early stage, as most cases in the US are. They can treat it right away or monitor with periodic tests and treat later if it worsens or causes symptoms. Now, long-term results are in from one of the few studies comparing these options in men with tumours confined to the prostate.

After 20 years, death rates were roughly similar for those who had immediate surgery and those initially assigned to monitoring, and surgery had more side effects. “Many men, when they hear the word cancer, you want to do something about it,” said one study leader, Dr Gerald Andriole, urology chief at Washington University in St Louis, Missouri. “The reality is, if you have a low-risk cancer, like the study shows, you don’t need treatment, certainly not urgently.”

It’s not all black and white, though. Early stage doesn’t necessarily mean low risk. Some results in the study lean in favour of surgery, and it does have some advantages. It also may improve survival for certain groups. Here’s what this and other studies tell us about who does and doesn’t benefit from surgery.

While some prostate tumours are deadly, most grow at a slow rate. (Shutterstock)

Why not treat everyone?

Start with a fact many find hard to accept: Not all cancers are destined to kill. Some prostate tumours are deadly, but most grow so slowly that men will die of something else. Treatments — surgery, radiation or hormone therapy — can cause impotence, incontinence, infections and other problems, and sometimes do more harm than the disease ever would.

Monitoring doesn’t mean do nothing. Men can get frequent tests, and there are more and better ways to detect disease progression now than there used to be, so there’s usually still a chance to treat and potentially cure it if it starts to worsen, Andriole said.

What the evidence says

Only a few studies have tested monitoring versus immediate treatment. One found no difference in death rates after more than 20 years; another found surgery improved survival odds, but only for men under 65. Those were done before wide use of PSA blood tests, back when more tumours were found because they caused symptoms, which often means more advanced disease. Researchers wondered: Would the results be the same with modern screening and treatments?

The new study, sponsored by the US Department of Veterans Affairs, aimed to answer that. Doctors assigned 731 men to observation or surgery. After a decade, survival rates were similar, but doctors wanted longer follow-up. Now, after 20 years, two-thirds of these men have died and the original conclusions still stand, though the numbers leaned in surgery’s favour. Fewer men died in the surgery group, but the difference was small enough that it could have been due to chance. Only about 9% of men ultimately died from prostate cancer, showing how relatively seldom the disease proves fatal. Results are in Thursday’s New England Journal of Medicine.

Why Uttarakhand must not use English for teaching in govt schools

For a child, the school acts like a bridge connecting the home and the world. In this transitional crossing of environments, research and study have consistently highlighted the key role played by the mother tongue. That, when instructed in the mother tongue or home language, children perform better in subject-based learning. So, adopting English as the medium of instruction for early-age learners (from Class 1) in schools, like the proposed plan for government institutions in Uttarakhand, looks problematic.

Education begins at home with the home language and gets conditioned by sights, sounds, smells, tastes, and touch, within doors or close by. The move from home to school alters the learning environment. School, whether private or government, presents a structure, a system for learning, whereas earlier it was a natural flow of experience. It presents new peers, teachers, content, discipline, and format. It’s a lot to adjust to quickly, and then, a new language of instruction.

If education inspires learning and questioning, and if education facilitates freedom of enquiry without fear, then which is better — a medium of instruction using the homely local mother tongue or a powerful global language like English?

When instructed in the mother tongue or home language, children perform better in subject-based learning. So, adopting English as the medium of instruction for early-age learners in schools, like the proposed plan for government institutions in Uttarakhand, looks problematic (For representative purposes only)

Looking at global trends and the aspirations of new generations, an English medium of instruction appears attractive. Such a strategy seems to offer better opportunities for higher education, enhanced career prospects and professional growth, and overall economic well-being. But communicative competence in English — more suited for higher education or professional development — comes later.

What about thorough grounding in curriculum subjects, of which English is simply one subject of study; understanding concepts and thinking independently; responding to and framing questions and offering solutions; creativity and innovation in a disruptive global environment; and learning 21st-century life skills? This real learning becomes that much more difficult without a mother-tongue-led instruction. In a non-English-speaking environment, using English to teach curriculum subjects does not come easy. Add to this the teacher’s competence in handling English — first, in mastering the language; second, in using English to teach curriculum subjects — which remains a cause for concern.

Does the mother tongue offer something better? Representing natural transition from learning at home, using the mother tongue to teach curriculum subjects leads to greater emotional connection with the classroom, teachers, peers, and the learning process. Tending to actively engaged children, teachers — able users of the local language like their students — can give free rein to their creative and innovative impulses: Learning becomes student-led (rather than teacher-led), encouraging skill development. Naturally competent in imbibing new languages and now confident in their learning ability, children can easily pick up any new language — including English. It’s an all-round healthy learning outcome.

Unesco together with Unicef, the World Bank, UNFPA, UNDP, UN Women, and UNHCR organised the World Education Forum 2015 in Incheon, South Korea. The Incheon Declaration and Framework for Action for the Implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 4 (Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all) states, in Point 32: ‘In multilingual contexts, where possible and taking into account differing national and subnational realities, capacities and policies, teaching and learning in the first or home language should be encouraged.’ Point 59 says: ‘Particular attention should be paid to the role of learners’ first language in becoming literate and in learning.’ Setting out a new vision for education for the next 15 years, the Incheon Declaration for Education 2030 has been adopted by over 180 Unesco member states.

We are a young nation. We are a confederation of states with developed languages and rich literatures held together by the common desire for amity and unity. We have had a deeply disturbing colonial past, a recent brutal one, which led to the use of English.

Instead of changing the medium of classroom instruction, the way forward lies in evolving a connected and implementable approach to school education: Develop instructional material for students and teachers that sustains creativity, conceptualise robust teacher training programmes, roll out innovative teaching methodologies, ensure goal-and-outcome focused learning assessments and, apply data and analytics for personalised learning.

Shaping the mammoth enterprise of school education affecting so many young lives, we should not fail to train our eyes on our roots, our unique, indigenous languages, to offer a learning environment that fosters connection, belonging, and identity embedded in the child’s culture.

In here lies our tryst with destiny.