7 New Fried Desserts to Enjoy While The Monsoon Season Lasts

While the rain makes the weather breezy and beautiful, it also comes with an intense craving for fried foods. The change in weather prompts a change in our menu with summery snacks giving way to inventive and innovative fried food items. But why should we restrict ourselves to tea time savouries? There’s a lot out there to satisfy your sweet tooth too. The magnificent monsoon lends itself to a rainbow of the most delicious fried desserts. Crisp on the outside, moist and sweet on the inside, these desserts will leave you drooling and tempt you to run to your kitchen. Here’s a list of 8 unusual fried desserts that will satisfy your cravings instantly.

7 New Fried Desserts to Enjoy While The Monsoon Season Lasts

1. Chocolate Jalebi 

 

As the weather shifts from the scorching heat to pleasant skies, we all get that tingly feeling in our tummies craving for something hot and crispy. Since we’re surrounded by tons of sweets, how do we pick which dessert would be perfect for the season? It is next to impossible to resist the chocolate jalebi! A lovely combination of your favourite fried Indian dessert jalebi and chocolate.

How To Make: Add a cup of flour, one tablespoon baking soda, a cup of water and a little bit of color (orange) in a bowl, mix it well and pour it into a frying pan to make jalebis with the help of a cheesecloth. Once they’re ready, dip them in a bowl of melted chocolate and serve hot.

 

2.  Fried Ice-Cream

The epitome of soul food – ice-cream! Admit it or not, we all have a soft corner for ice-cream in our hearts. This time around, try the fried ice-cream. You are sure to get addicted.

How To Make: Scoop 6-8 balls of vanilla ice-cream and freeze it further for an hour. After freezing, dip the balls in whipped egg whites one by one and further cover them with some crushed biscuits. Deep fry the ice-cream and enjoy.

 

3. Deep Fried Cookie Dough

 

Deep fried cookie dough is one of the best fried desserts you could have asked for. Cookies always manage to lift our mood and trust us, fried cookie dough is even better. Every single bite will leave you craving for more.

How to Make: Add 1 stick of butter, ½ cup of brown sugar, 2 tablespoon granulated sugar, 1 tsp vanilla extract, 1 egg, 1 ¼ cup all purpose flour, ½ tsp salt, 1 cup milk and lots of chocolate chips in a bowl to make the cookie dough. Mix them well to make cookie batter and leave it to freeze for an hour. For frying, coat the cough dough balls with corn flakes or bread crumbs and fry away.

 

4. Banana Balls

 

The great part about bananas is that they can be eaten with or without experimentation. To add a quirky twist to the fruit, we can fry the bananas pieces. Banana balls serve as the perfect snack for your evening coffee or tea.

How To Make: Cut bananas into small pieces and mix it with brown sugar to make a paste. Add a little bit of flour, cardamom powder, desiccated coconut powder and baking soda and coat the bananas with this mix. Make little balls and fry them for tea-time.

5. Cake Fries

What could be better than sizzling and crispy French fries? Well, nothing really but now you can enjoy fries for dessert! These fries are made with ingredients that are used to bake a cake. This is probably one of the most unusual and inventive desserts that can be served at your weekend gathering. Serve them with a dark chocolate dip or plain maple syrup.

How To Make: Add 3 eggs, 2 cups of milk, ¼ cup of granulated sugar, 3 cups of all-purpose flour, 2 teaspoon baking powder, ½ teaspoon salt. Whisk everything together for a smooth batter. Add the batter to a funnel with a large hole in order to make funnel cake strands and fry these strands to have the yummy cake fries!

6. Fried Chocolate and Coconut Modak

Sweet dumplings but covered with chocolate? Now, that sounds exquisite. Usually, modak is eaten during festivals keeping us away from it for a long time. To satisfy your needs, this famous Indian dessert can now be made with a chocolaty twist.

How To Cook: Take a bowl and saute one cup of shredded coconut for about 7-8 minutes. In a separate bowl, melt ¼ cup of milk and chocolate side by side. Once its melted, add the chocolate to shredded coconut and keep it aside. For the batter, take a bowl and add 1 cup all-purpose flour, ¼ cup of wheat flour, ¼ cup of suji, ½ cup of milk, 1 tsp oil, and a pinch of salt for tasting. Mix all of them together to make the dough and keep them aside for 20 minutes. Roll little puris, fill the chocolate and coconut mix in the center and shape them like a modak (tear-drop shaped) which can then be deep fried and enjoyed.

 

7. Fried Donut Holes

 

Donuts have been around for years. They are a beloved American snack but are enjoyed all over the world. These donut holes originate from donuts – the portion that is cut out to make the rings. These sweet treats can be easily made at home if one is in the mood to experiment!

How To Make: In a bowl, add 2 cups of all-purpose flour, 3 tablespoon sugar, 1 tablespoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon salt, 5 tablespoon cold butter, and ¾ cups of milk. Whisk them together to make a smooth batter. Make little balls and fry them into a pan. Once they’re out of the pan, roll them in a bowl of sugar. You can even glaze them if you like and serve with jam or caramel sauce.

 

8. Apple Fritters

 

This fruity dessert that can easily satisfy your sugar cravings. This dessert gives you everything that you are looking for to enjoy the nippy weather. They are best served warm and crispy and give you a beautiful fruity taste.

How To Make: In a large bowl, whisk together 2 cups of flour, ¼ cups of granulated sugar, 2 ¼ baking powder and 1 teaspoon of salt. In another bowl, whisk together ¾ cups of milk, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoon butter and ½ tsp vanilla. Gently fold the milk mixture into the flour mixture. Cut the apples into circular slices and dip them in the batter. Fry them in a pan for a few minutes and enjoy the hot and crispy fritters!
Alright, we know you’re already tempted to try them. So, get going.

Govt may spend over Rs20,000 crore on six new IITs

The central government is looking to spend above an amount of Rs 20,000 crore to build six new Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) it first announced in 2015, at least two government officials said.

Of this, Rs7,000 crore will be spent in the first phase ending in March 2020 and the rest over the next four years ending in March 2024, the officials said on condition of anonymity.

IIT Kharagpur, Main Building, Kharagpur, West Bengal

MORE FROM LIVEMINT »

New IITs incur less expense in the first couple of years as they operate from temporary premises with limited staff, research work, course and students. The union human resource development ministry, the officials said, is in the process of moving the expenditure finance committee (EFC) to get approval for the first phase. After this, it will ask the EFC to approve the rest.

In December 2015, the Union cabinet cleared the proposal to open six new IITs in Andhra Pradesh, Kerala, Karnataka, Chhattisgarh, Goa and Jammu and Kashmir. The six IITs now operate from makeshift campuses in these states.

“Unlike institutions like IIMs, IITs need much more funds to be established because of the multi-disciplinary and research nature of the IITs. Hopefully, the EFC will give a go-ahead following which new IITs will scale up their operation—both from academic and infrastructure points of view,” said one of the two officials cited above.

During the 11th Five Year Plan, which ended in march 2012, the previous UPA government had estimated to spend over Rs6,000 crore for eight new IITs. But delays in land procurement, construction and inflation pushed up costs to Rs14,000 crore.

The additional money was approved following months of deliberations after the NDA government came to power in 2014. The eight IITs are now open in Gandhinagar, Bhubaneswar, Hyderabad, Indore, Jodhpur, Ropar, Mandi and Patna. “This time, we are trying our best not to face cost escalation. It was a problem last time and we have learned from that experience,” said the second of the two officials. This official said land procurement was a key challenge last time, delaying construction and pushing up costs.

“Land for six new IITs has already been procured and states’ cooperation this time is good. Once the EFC approval comes, things will pick up,” the official said.

A professor from an older IIT closely associated with the establishment of new IITs said timely funding is key, and before that, states must give land to the HRD ministry for the purpose. The last time, he said some states could not provide land even after five years. Besides, in some cases, land was allocated without forest clearances leading to legal hassles, the professor said.

“Cost escalation problem arises when it’s not planned properly. While delays in construction and land procurement leads to more expense, it also hampers the IITs educationally. An IIT has its own brand value but it has to be properly supported; else, that brand equity gets hampered.

The upcoming new education policy must make it clear that new higher educational institutions should not be delayed beyond a certain time limit. Else, the intention of establishing IITs and similar institutes gets diluted. It’s not just a finance issue, but also a bigger academic issue,” said Narayan Ramaswamy, partner education practice at consulting firm KPMG.

A fresh coat of paint, better plumbing and drinking water: How 5 teachers gave a Rajasthan school, and its students, a new life

When she joined the Girls’ Upper Primary School (GUPS) in Alwar’s Shivaji Park in December 2016, Hemlata Sharma, 47, had been teaching for 27 years. This was her first posting as head teacher and never before had she been so appalled by the condition of the school.

Classrooms leaked in the rain, plaster peeled off the wall. The entire building was in a state of disrepair and housed just 100 students from classes 1 to 8.

Sharma took up a challenge to bring the school back to life before the next academic session in July and roped in four other teachers for support.

Pleasing seating areas, space for interaction: The old school now is all bright and cheerful (HT Photo)

Within four months, things changed – the walls were painted in bright colours, the classrooms spruced up and a lawn laid out in front. An underground rainwater recharge tank, an RO plant for drinking water, and new furniture in all classrooms were also added. Leakages were plugged.

Just 15 days after schools opened, enrolment went up to 202. Some admissions were pending clearance for lack of Aadhaar and birth certificates.

Sharma was also determined to do something about Rajasthan’s high school dropout rate. The 2016 Annual Status of Education Report survey of schooling and learning levels in rural India ranks the state among the top three with the highest dropout rates in children aged 11 to 14 (5% among all-India average of 3.5%). To get more children to her school, she turned to her family for donation to start repairs.

A garden has been laid out for the children to play in. (HT Photo)

“I asked my sisters, brother and father for money and collected Rs 40,000 from them. After that I went to my teachers,” said Sharma, who added Rs 11,000 from her savings into the school renovation kitty.

Manju Rani Sharma, who retired on May 31, donated Rs 21,000 as a parting gift to the school. Three other teachers – Sanika Sharma, Sashi Singhal and Kavita Sharma – also donated to take the teachers’ contribution Rs 51,000.

After collecting about Rs 1 lakh, the teachers began work. For changing the infrastructure, Sharma met district Sarv Shiksha Abhiyan officials, who, impressed by her efforts, sanctioned Rs 2 lakh more.

Sanika Sharma, who will retire in June next year, said they approached philanthropists in town for furniture in classrooms and free uniforms for students.

On June 8 this year, the teachers distributed among 170 students a new uniform set and a pair of shoes and socks.

Clean water, waste disposal – the school has now got new, upgraded facilities. (HT Photo)

“It was on that day that I proposed to my colleagues that teachers should wear uniform to school to enforce discipline – and the teachers agreed,” said Sharma.

Now the students wear brown trousers and skirts and light brown shirts, and the teachers wear off-white salwar and dupatta and maroon kurta.

Two teenagers who passed Class 12 recently come in regularly to teach junior school students to make up for shortage of teachers. “Parul and Priyanka, twin daughters of school management committee president Kusum Rohilla, are coming to school since June 22 after two of the five teachers got transferred out,” the head teacher said.

The two girls are in the first year of college.

Recently, Imran Khan from Alwar, who was lauded by PM Narendra Modi at London’s Wembley Stadium in 2015 for creating apps for the benefit of students, got the school four computers and a printer.

New smartphone app offers non-invasive test for diabetics

British scientists have developed a new smartphone app that can help measure and monitor blood glucose levels without using a drop of blood, a finding that can transform lives of millions of people with diabetes. The app — called as Epic Health — replaces the need for diabetics to prick their fingers several times a day.

The app, suitable for both Type 1 and 2 diabetics, works by placing a fingertip over the camera lens of a smartphone and capturing a series of close-up images that convey information about the user’s heart rate, temperature and blood pressure to respiration rate and blood oxygen saturation, the researchers said.

“The app uses a simple protocol which prompts the user to take a noninvasive test and this allows us to capture the vital information in a systematic way which produces the most consistent results,” Dominic Wood, founder of the app, was quoted as saying to the express.co.uk.

“This is a massive driver of prevention,” and even targets, “everyone yet to be diagnosed with or in the general risk of diabetes when it’s still preventable”, Wood added.

Importantly, the Epic app can measure insulin resistance level — a key way of determining whether someone is pre-diabetic. It does this by measuring the variation in the patient’s pulse which is related to blood glucose concentration. This would allow someone to alter their lifestyle to avoid developing full-blown Type 2 diabetes, the researchers said.

“The prospect of a non-invasive app that monitors blood glucose levels without a drop of blood and without even an accompanying piece of technology is an exciting one,” said Dan Howarth from Diabetes UK. The app, which has been in development for three years, will undergo clinical trials in the coming months.

It will be available to download, free of charge, by the end of the year, the researchers said.

New biomarkers may help detect brain injury faster

Researchers have identified inflammatory biomarkers which can be used to develop a test that can help detect whether the brain has suffered injury in the first hour of accident.

The test can be used on the side of a sports pitch or by paramedics to detect traumatic brain injury — which leads to very early alterations in inflammatory proteins — at the scene of an accident, as well as improve clinical interventions, the researchers said.

“Traumatic brain injury is the leading cause of death and disability among young adults and, according to the World Health Organization, by 2020 this will become the world’s leading cause of neurological disability across all age groups,” said Lisa Hill from the University of Birmingham in the Britian.

The study identified three inflammatory biomarkers — known as CST5, AXIN1 and TRAIL — of traumatic brain injury.

While CST5 identified patients with severe traumatic brain injury within the first hour of injury, AXIN1 and TRAIL were able to discriminate between brain injury and uninjured patient controls in an hour.

“Early and objective pre-hospital detection of traumatic brain injury would support clinical decision making and the correct triage of major trauma,” added Valentina Di Pietro from the University’s Institute of Inflammation and Ageing.

Moreover, correct diagnosis of traumatic brain injury, which is one of hardest diagnosis to make in medicine, would allow clinicians to implement strategies to reduce secondary brain injury at an early stage, the researchers said.

Currently, no reliable biomarkers exist to help diagnose the severity of traumatic brain injury and identify patients who are at risk of developing secondary injuries that impair function, damage other brain structures and promote further cell death.

“In addition, this has potential implications for drug development, as novel compounds could be given immediately after injury and potentially commenced at the roadside, if there was sufficient confidence in the diagnosis of traumatic brain injury,” Pietro said.

For the study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, blood samples were taken from 30 injured patients within the first hour of injury prior to the patient arriving at hospital.

New York eatery tops world’s best restaurants 2017; India fails to make the list

At the annual World’s 50 Best awards held at the Royal Exhibition Building in Melbourne, the list of the top 50 restaurants in the world was revealed. According to the list, Eleven Madison Park, New York triumphed as a foodie’s heaven beating last year’s number one, Osteria Francescana in Modena, Italy. The Italian delicacy dropped down to second place. El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, Spain, took the third spot.

According to Bloomberg, Chef Daniel Humm said, “I never in my wildest dreams thought that I could find myself in this position. Cuisine has given me everything: I left school at 14 and pursued a craft that no one believed in at the time. Everything I have learned has been from food: languages, culture. I have traveled the world and met Will, who is my best friend as well as my business partner. It is unbelievable.”

This is the first time that a restaurant from the US has won since Chef Thomas Keller’s French Laundry in Yountville, California, bagged the title in 2003 and 2004. All other winners have been European.

Famous food scientist and chef, Heston Blumenthal’s restaurant Dinner at Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park, London made the top 50 at number 36.

Here’s the complete list of winners:

1. Eleven Madison Park (New York, USA)

2. Osteria Francescana (Modena, Italy)

3. El Celler de Can Roca (Girona, Spain)

4. Mirazur (Menton, France)

5. Central (Lima, Peru)

6. Asador Etxebarri (Axpe, Spain)

7. Gaggan (Bangkok, Thailand)

8. Maido (Lima, Peru)

9. Mugaritz (Errenteria, Spain)

10. Steirereck (Vienna, Austria)

11. Blue Hill at Stone Barns (New York, USA)

12. L’Arpège (Paris, France)

13. Alain Ducasse au Plaza Athénée (Paris, France)

14. Restaurant Andre (Singapore)

15. Piazza Duomo (Alba, Italy)

16. D.O.M. (São Paulo, Brazil)

17. Le Bernardin (New York, USA)

18. Narisawa (Tokyo, Japan)

19. Geranium (Copenhagen, Denmark)

20. Pujol (Mexico City, Mexico)

21. Alinea (Chicago, USA)

22. Quintonil (Mexico City, Mexico)

23. White Rabbit (Moscow, Russia)

24. Amber (Hong Kong)

25. Tickets (Barcelona, Spain)

26. The Clove Club (London, UK)

27. The Ledbury (London, UK)

28. Nahm (Bangkok, Thailand)

29. Le Calandre (Rubano, Italy)

30. Arzak (San Sebastian, Spain)

31. Alléno Paris au Pavillon Ledoyen (Paris, France)

32. Attica (Melbourne, Australia)

33. Astrid y Gastón (Lima, Peru)

34. De Librije (Zwolle, Netherlands)

35. Septime (Paris, France)

36. Dinner by Heston Blumenthal (London, UK)

37. Saison (San Francisco, USA)

38. Azurmendi (Larrabetzu, Spain)

39. Relae (Copenhagen, Denmark)

40. Cosme (New York, USA)

41. Ultraviolet by Paul Pairet (Shanghai, China)

42. Boragó (Santiago, Chile)

43. Reale (Castel Di Sangro, Italy)

44. Brae (Birregurra, Australia)

45. Den (Tokyo, Japan)

46. L’Astrance (Paris, France)

47. Vendôme (Cologne, Germany)

48. Restaurant Tim Raue (Berlin, Germany)

49. Tegui (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

50. Hof Van Cleve (Kruishoutem, Belgium)

MSBSHSE new evaluation pattern: Class IX students will not have oral tests in languages

Class IX students will no longer have to take oral examinations in languages and write internal assessments in social sciences, according to the new evaluation pattern announced by the Maharashtra State Board of Secondary and Higher Secondary Education (MSBSHSE).

In a circular issued on Thursday, the MSBSHSE announced the new evaluation pattern for Class IX students as per the new curriculum.

The circular states that students will have to attempt a theory examination for all three languages and social sciences for 100 marks. Currently, the subjects have 20 marks allotted to orals/assignments and 80 marks for theory.

MSBSHSE, MSBSHSE new evaluation pattern, mumbai exam pattern, mumbai oral test, indian express news, india news, education news

“Oral exams for languages and the 20 marks-assignments in social sciences have been scrapped. We came across instances of schools inflating internal marks for their students to increase their overall score. The move is aimed to stop this practice,” said an official from the education department.

The new pattern would come into effect from the 2017-18 academic year.

The official said that from the next academic year, the same marking pattern will be implemented for Class X.

New highlights of school education in Pune: Going beyond rote learning, including those left behind & using technology

If the number of schools is any indication, then the education sector in the city has seen nearly 100 per cent growth in the last two decades. From 2,626 schools affiliated to the state board of education in 2004, to 3,405 schools in 2017, the number has seen a sharp rise. Add to that, over 95 CBSE schools and 36 ICSE and ISC schools today — there were less than 30 schools earlier — and the establishment of about 10 IB board affiliated schools after 1997.

Educationists say that the methodology and outlook towards imparting education has changed significantly.

Around the same time the city saw the setting up of more international and non-state board affiliated schools, the concept of making learning interesting through classroom activities became popular, and even the state board realised the need to revamp its style. A programme of teachers’ training was put in place to make learning ‘joyful’, said Suman Shinde, former deputy director of education. Education is no longer only about imparting textbook knowledge, but it is about moving beyond the text.

Maharashtra education news, India news, Education news, India news, National news, latest news, India news, Pune Education news,

From rote learning to experiential learning

Devyani Mungali, an educationist whose career spans several decades, remembers how 20 years ago, teachers would restrict themselves to teaching what was in the textbooks, emphasising on retention value of the subject matter for students.
“At that time, teachers were the sole source of information. As English teachers, we concentrated on the writing skill of students and comprehension… most of it was functional learning. Even evaluations were based on textbook material… learning was mostly rote-based. Over the last few years, with exposure to technology and ICT material, the teachers’ role changed from being the sole giver of knowledge to being a facilitator. During this time, the syllabus started undergoing changes and so did the evaluation patterns… Students were scored on their skills and projects… they started seeking knowledge beyond textbooks that was encouraged by new marking patterns,” she said.

Devika Nadig, an educationist, said she feels that teacher-capacity building has been the most important change in the last few decades. “While a lot of people talk about ICT, a decade ago, corporates and others began looking at the way schools were run. One of the things revealed in the studies was that we rely heavily on rote memorisation… that perlocated down to teaching, as it was simply to memorise and the assessment was based on how the students could recall. The gamechanger was moving children to application-based learning… The other wave that came in around this time was the international schools – IB and other boards… As school education got more expensive, parents became consumers, earlier they demanded only marks, now they demand better teaching,” she said.

Introduction of technology in classrooms

However, educationists agree that one policy that has led to a sea change in the school education sector and transformed it completely is the integration of technology into classroom teaching. From state government projects to identify tech-savvy teachers to initiatives by private schools to introducing smart boards or tablets, integration of ICT into school education is the reality of today.

Lakshmi Kumar, director of The Orchid School, says that in the last two decades, one of the major changes in classroom teaching has been the introduction of smart boards, laptops, tablets with pre-loaded content, and introduction of YouTube into tutorials. “… Today, with ICT-enabled classrooms, a 40-minute explanation can be done in 10 minutes. Conceptual doubts are easier to resolve as students can be engaged through digital content and shown things practically. We have an opportunity now to move to the next step of the learning process, beyond mere recall and retention of concepts, to application and analysis… Even government-run Zilla Parishad schools are part of this digital evolution …,” she said.

Technology has also changed the relationship between parents and schools. Stating that school administrations have gained hugely from the use of technology, Kumar pointed out different ways of how it worked.; like instantly reaching out to parents, sharing information via e-circulars, and more.

RTE, regulatory laws and child-centric policies

Educationists unanimously agree that if there was one law that changed the way schools function, it was the introduction of the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education. On one hand, it opened a window for quality education for all by reserving 25 per cent seats for students from low-income families; on the other hand, it also introduced child-centric policies like stricter laws on corporal punishment. “Until RTE was introduced, people viewed only physical harm to a student as child rights violation. But RTE mandated that no child could be mentally harassed…” said Shinde.

Shinde said it was the Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan, which became operational around 2001, which started off the process before the RTE Act. “Through that programme, schools which were dilapidated or had no classrooms or toilets started getting funds, improving their condition,” she said.

Inclusive education

Another parallel movement working towards inclusion was trying to bring students with special needs into mainstream education. Not only did the RTE Act mandate a non-discriminatory policy, but various school boards rose to the occasion by introducing a slew of concessions. “In the late 1990s, if you had a special child, very few schools would dare to admit them… Now, with the concessions by boards, the RTE rules and general awareness among schools, the scenario is far better…,” added Kumar.

NASA's Hubble Telescope Images Distant Galaxy With New Computer Code

By applying a new computational analysis to a distant galaxy, astronomers have obtained images 10 times sharper than what Hubble could achieve on its own, NASA has said. The results show an edge-on disk galaxy studded with brilliant patches of newly formed stars.

“When we saw the reconstructed image we said, ‘Wow, it looks like fireworks are going off everywhere’,” said astronomer Jane Rigby of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

The galaxy in question is so far away that we see it as it appeared 11 billion years ago, only 2.7 billion years after the big bang.

It is one of more than 70 strongly lensed galaxies studied by the Hubble space telescope, following up targets selected by the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey, which discovered hundreds of strongly lensed galaxies by searching Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data covering one-fourth of the sky.

 NASA's Hubble Telescope Images Distant Galaxy With New Computer Code

The gravity of a giant cluster of galaxies between the target galaxy and Earth distorts the more distant galaxy’s light, stretching it into an arc and also magnifying it almost 30 times.

The team had to develop special computer code to remove the distortions caused by the gravitational lens, and reveal the disk galaxy as it would normally appear.

The resulting reconstructed image revealed two dozen clumps of newborn stars, each spanning about 200 to 300 light-years.

This contradicted theories suggesting that star-forming regions in the distant, early universe were much larger, 3,000 light-years or more in size.

These findings appeared in a paper published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters and two additional papers published in The Astrophysical Journal.

Drinking Coffee Helps You Live Longer, Pair Of New Studies Confirm

There’s another scientific evidence for you to enjoy your regular cup of joe in the morning.

Two new large studies published Monday, July 10, in the Annals of Internal Medicine showed that coffee could extend one’s life through reducing the risk of death from heart disease, stroke, diabetes, or even cancer. This link between coffee and reduced death risk held up even if one is having a decaffeinated drink.

The studies involved more than 700,000 participants from across a number of races, ethnicities, and cultural backgrounds.

1st Study: Across 10 Leading Causes Of Death In The US

In the first study, a team out of the University of Southern California, University of Hawaii, and the National Cancer Institute analyzed the coffee-drinking habits of more than 185,000 Americans participating in the Multiethnic Cohort Study, which had been following volunteers since 1993.

Subjects who consumed two or more cups of coffee a day were around 18 percent less likely to die during the study period, compared with the 16 percent who did not drink coffee at all.

Increased coffee intake also led to fewer chances of dying from some of the leading causes of death in the country, from heart disease and cancer to chronic lower respiratory disease and kidney disease. Coffee, however, had no effect on the risks of dying from pneumonia, flu, Alzheimer’s disease, suicide, or accidents.

The associations were not found to vary by race or ethnicity, with the links proving statistically significant in every group except Native Hawaiians, who researchers thought were not sufficient enough in numbers in the research to prove anything.

2nd Study: Coffee And Early Mortality In 10 European Nations

The second study gathered data from a study to probe the same link in more than 521,000 people from France, Denmark, Greece, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, Spain, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.

The discovery: the top quarter of coffee drinkers in every nation emerged less likely to die during the study period than those who were not coffee drinkers at all.

Accounting for other death factors, the researchers estimated there was 12 percent lower risk of early death in males and 7 percent lower in females.

Even Decaf Does The Trick

Both teams saw evidence that the benefits are available for those who consumed decaf.

Note that the studies were not designed to confirm that coffee consumption led to longer lives. But an editorial accompanying the studies cited several potential reasons for dodging early death, such as the polyphenols in coffee that act as antioxidants and help cells fight free radicals.

The new findings bolster evidence of coffee benefits. But it’s crucial to point out that too much of a good thing could be bad: a teen from South Carolina, for instance, recently died after drinking a café latte, a large Diet Mountain Dew, and an energy drink in a relatively short span of time.