Plant-Based Protein, a Reason to Let Go of Meat

With the world moving towards a more harmonious existence with the environment, it becomes imperative that our food habits must change too. Consumption of meat, processed foods, or year around foods are not just factors that harm our health but they contribute to creating an ecological imbalance, as reported by various studies. So what’s gaining popularity amidst this fight for sustainable and better living are plant-based proteins. Call it a new food trend, this category of food is fast making its way into the culinary world, gaining more attention in the recent months.

With an abundance of plant based protein sources like chickpeas, soy, beans etc vegetarianism is rising steadily too. An alternative to dairy and animal protein, plant protein claim a lower carbon footprint on the environment. It’s a category of protein that is obtained from plants and provides all the essential nine amino acids that the body requires.

Plant-Based Protein, a Reason to Let Go of Meat

Plant proteins are said to have a more positive impact on the body since they come without additional saturated fats and other harmful trans fats that could be dangerous in the long run. Plant foods as compared to animal foods are richer in antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and other micronutrients that the body needs for its proper functioning. Thus, plant protein sources contain phytochemicals that fortify the body against illnesses.

 

In a bid to become more sensitive towards the environment, one such attempt has been made by Canada. These include certain additions and eliminations to renew the current food guidelines. With a decision to eliminate diary and meat products, it aims to promote a healthy regimen that ensures nutritious intake of food and to discard food that is rich in saturated fats, sodium and sugar-based beverages.

 

Some of the sources of plant-based proteins include soy, lentils, pulses, nuts, seeds, quinoa, ancient grains like millet, etc.

 

Scared to go to US: Indian students worry about physical safety, says survey

Washington Indian students have a “high level of concern” about potential study in the US and a large number of them worry about their physical safety and about the feeling of being welcomed, says a new survey.

The Institute of International Education (IIE) suggested that the final outcome of the US Supreme Court order in June that temporarily upheld President Donald Trump’s executive order to restrict entry of nationals from six Muslim majority countries to America weighs on their mind.

With over a million international students pursuing higher education in the US and contributing more than $36 billion to the American economy, the stakes are high, it said.

Image result for Scared to go to US: Indian students worry about physical safety, says survey

Founded in 1919, the IIE is a US-based not-for-profit working to build peaceful and equitable societies by advancing scholarship, building economies and promoting access to opportunity. It focuses on International student exchange and aid, foreign affairs, and international peace and security.

The IIE said that the survey results indicate the highest level of institutional concern regarding enrolment of students from the Middle East, followed by India.

Thirty-one per cent of institutions are very concerned that Middle Eastern students who have accepted offers of admissions may not arrive on campus in the fall, and 20% are very concerned that Indian students may not arrive on campus, it said.

“This uncertainty raises valid concerns as to whether students from the Middle East may be deterred from US study,” it said.

“Securing and maintaining a visa is reported as the top concern among these students and was reported by 46 % of institutions, while feeling welcome in the United States was an almost equal concern, with 41% of institutions noting so from their conversations with students,” it added.

According to the IIE, survey findings suggest that Indian students “have a high level of concern about potential study in the United States, 80% of institutions responded that physical safety was the most pronounced concern for Indian students, while 31% of institutions indicated that feeling welcome was also a concern.”

“Although application totals appear to largely remain stable, yield rates and a concern about personal safety suggest the possibility that Indian students may not continue to grow as the second largest international group in US higher education,” IIE said.

“Their concerns may lead some Indian students to accept admissions offers from other leading host countries, especially from those that issue student visas more quickly.”

The IIE, however, said despite widespread concerns that international student interest in the US might be flagging, the evidence from this survey suggests that “this is not the case.”

It said that interest among international students in the US remains steady overall despite the current environment.

According to the study, modest drops in yield – the percentage of students that attend a college or university after having been offered admission – at some institutions may be offset by steady or increased yield at other schools.

Among the 112 colleges that provided data there was a 2% decline in the expected yield rate this year compared to last year.

Overall, international undergraduate yield has dipped slightly from 26 to 24% from fall 2016 to fall 2017.

The two percentage point decline is comparable to shifts in the domestic (US) student yield reported by institutional respondents, which fell from 30 to 28% over the same time period, it said.

According to the study, there is however little concern about students from Europe and Canada arriving on campus in the fall and only modest concern about students’ arrival from China and Latin America.

Scared to go to US: Indian students worry about physical safety, says survey

Washington Indian students have a “high level of concern” about potential study in the US and a large number of them worry about their physical safety and about the feeling of being welcomed, says a new survey.

The Institute of International Education (IIE) suggested that the final outcome of the US Supreme Court order in June that temporarily upheld President Donald Trump’s executive order to restrict entry of nationals from six Muslim majority countries to America weighs on their mind.

With over a million international students pursuing higher education in the US and contributing more than $36 billion to the American economy, the stakes are high, it said.

Founded in 1919, the IIE is a US-based not-for-profit working to build peaceful and equitable societies by advancing scholarship, building economies and promoting access to opportunity. It focuses on International student exchange and aid, foreign affairs, and international peace and security.

The IIE said that the survey results indicate the highest level of institutional concern regarding enrolment of students from the Middle East, followed by India.

Thirty-one per cent of institutions surveyed in the US are concerned that Middle Eastern students who have accepted offers of admissions may not arrive on campus in the fall, and 20% are very concerned that Indian students may not arrive on campus, a survey has revealed.

Thirty-one per cent of institutions are very concerned that Middle Eastern students who have accepted offers of admissions may not arrive on campus in the fall, and 20% are very concerned that Indian students may not arrive on campus, it said.

“This uncertainty raises valid concerns as to whether students from the Middle East may be deterred from US study,” it said.

“Securing and maintaining a visa is reported as the top concern among these students and was reported by 46 % of institutions, while feeling welcome in the United States was an almost equal concern, with 41% of institutions noting so from their conversations with students,” it added.

According to the IIE, survey findings suggest that Indian students “have a high level of concern about potential study in the United States, 80% of institutions responded that physical safety was the most pronounced concern for Indian students, while 31% of institutions indicated that feeling welcome was also a concern.”

“Although application totals appear to largely remain stable, yield rates and a concern about personal safety suggest the possibility that Indian students may not continue to grow as the second largest international group in US higher education,” IIE said.

“Their concerns may lead some Indian students to accept admissions offers from other leading host countries, especially from those that issue student visas more quickly.”

The IIE, however, said despite widespread concerns that international student interest in the US might be flagging, the evidence from this survey suggests that “this is not the case.”

It said that interest among international students in the US remains steady overall despite the current environment.

According to the study, modest drops in yield – the percentage of students that attend a college or university after having been offered admission – at some institutions may be offset by steady or increased yield at other schools.

Among the 112 colleges that provided data there was a 2% decline in the expected yield rate this year compared to last year.

Overall, international undergraduate yield has dipped slightly from 26 to 24% from fall 2016 to fall 2017.

The two percentage point decline is comparable to shifts in the domestic (US) student yield reported by institutional respondents, which fell from 30 to 28% over the same time period, it said.

According to the study, there is however little concern about students from Europe and Canada arriving on campus in the fall and only modest concern about students’ arrival from China and Latin America.

Go for ‘Grills on Fire’ to relish heavenly kebabs at The Ancient Barbeque

Ever wondered how a dish named drunken fish or wine-glazed mushroom would taste? Head for the ongoing Grills on Fire — a fiery feast at The Ancient Barbeque (TAB) in this suburb of the national capital where an array of 24 kebabs — vegan and non-vegan — await the opportunity to tickle your tummy.

TAB specialises in grilled delicacies and this makes it an ideal place for foodies who enjoy digging into starters more than the main course.

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“There are too many restaurants with the same menu. We thought of coming up with something different. We wanted to focus mostly on the barbeque dishes and cater in the best best possible way,” Jehangir Khan, Branch Manager, The Ancient Barbeque said.

So how did the thought of a festival focused on kebabs happen?

“Since we are already focused on grilled items so, we wanted to bring in some more variety to the existing menu. The items which will be liked by visitors will also be included in the main menu,” Khan replied.

Samsung Galaxy On Max to Go on Sale in India Today: Price, Specifications

Samsung Galaxy On Max, the recently launched new camera-centric phablet from the South Korean consumer electronics giant, will go on sale for the first time in India on Monday. The smartphone will go on sale via exclusive retail partner Flipkart from 11:59pm IST.

The Galaxy On Max, which supports Samsung Pay Mini, is almost identical to the recently launched Samsung Galaxy J7 Max, which was made available via offline retail stores and the Samsung India site with a price of Rs. 17,900. The primary difference between the Samsung Galaxy J7 Max and the Samsung Galaxy On Max is in the processor. The former bears a MediaTek Helio P20 SoC, while the latter bears a MediaTek Helio P25 Lite SoC.

Samsung Galaxy On Max price in India

The Samsung Galaxy On Max price in India is Rs. 16,900, while the smartphone will be available in Black and Gold colour variants in the country. Launch offer includes a Rs. 2,000 discount for buyers using Standard Chartered credit and debit cards. At its price, the smartphone compares with the Oppo F3, Moto G5 Plus, Oppo F1s, Honor 8, Honor 8 Lite, and even the Samsung Galaxy J7 Prime.

Samsung Galaxy On Max specifications

The dual-SIM Samsung Galaxy On Max runs Android 7.0 Nougat, and sports a 5.7-inch full-HD (1080×1920 pixels) display. The smartphone is powered by an octa-core MediaTek MTK P25 SoC (with four cores clocked at 2.39GHz and four cores clocked at 1.69GHz) coupled with 4GB of RAM.

samsung galaxy on max side samsung

Coming to the cameras on the Samsung Galaxy On – the smartphone bears 13-megapixel sensors and LED flash modules both on the front and back. The front sensor is coupled with a f/1.9 aperture lens, while the rear sensor is coupled with a f/1.7 aperture lens, which the company claims provide great low-light performance.

The smartphone bears 32GB of inbuilt storage that’s expandable via microSD card (up to 256GB). For connectivity options, the smartphone offers 4G VoLTE, alongside Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, a 3.5mm audio jack, and a Micro-USB port. It weighs 178 grams and measures 156.6×78.7×8.1mm. It is powered by a 3300mAh battery.

Samsung Galaxy On Max features

The Samsung Galaxy On Max sports a fingerprint sensor on the home button. It also supports Samsung Pay Mini, which was launched in India last month alongside the Samsung Galaxy J7 Pro and Galaxy J7 Max. It supports UPI-based payments and integrates a mobile wallet, but forgoes the NFC and MST-powered offline tap-to-pay features that essentially replace debit and credit cards.

Samsung is also touting the Social Camera Mode on the Samsung Galaxy On Max – the feature is supposed to provide instant sharing options to users, letting them pin their favourite social media contacts for quick sharing. The company says the Social Camera Mode also lets users utilise live stickers.

Xiaomi Redmi 4 to Go on Sale via Mi.com Today

Xiaomi Redmi 4 (Review) will go on sale in India on Tuesday. This time however, thanks to the Amazon Prime Day sale, the smartphone will not be available to buy on Amazon India. Instead, the Redmi 4 will only be up for purchase via Mi.com, the company’s own retail store. To recall, the Redmi 4 had gone on sale earlier this week via Amazon India, just ahead of the Prime Day sale, at 5pm IST on Monday. Now, the smartphone will go on sale via Mi.com at 12pm IST on Tuesday.

Mi.com is offering 10 percent SuperCash to consumers who buy the Redmi 4 using MobiKwik. Separately, it is also offering a free 12-month subscription to Hungama Music. The Xiaomi Redmi 4 was launched in India back in May, and is actually the Redmi 4X that was launched in China back in February this year, and not the China variant of the Redmi 4 that Xiaomi had launched in November last year.

Xiaomi Redmi 4 price in India

The Xiaomi Redmi 4 price in India starts at Rs. 6,999 for the 2GB RAM/ 16GB storage variant, and goes up to Rs. 8,999 for the 3GB RAM/ 32GB storage variant, and Rs. 10,999 for the 4GB RAM/ 64GB storage variant.

Xiaomi Redmi 4 to Go on Sale via Mi.com Today

 

Xiaomi Redmi 4 specifications

The dual-SIM (Micro+Nano) Xiaomi Redmi 4 runs MIUI 8 based on Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow. It sports an all-metal body and a fingerprint sensor on the rear panel. The smartphone bears a 5-inch HD (720×1280 pixels) 2.5D curved glass display. It is powered by a Snapdragon 435 SoC, with up to 4GB of RAM.

The Xiaomi Redmi 4 sports a 13-megapixel rear camera sensor with f/2.0 aperture, PDAF, and LED flash. On the front, it packs a 5-megapixel front camera with f/2.2 aperture. Xiaomi Redmi 4’s inbuilt storage is expandable via microSD card (up to 128GB).

Connectivity options on the Redmi 4 include 4G VoLTE, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, GPS/ A-GPS, Micro-USB with OTG, Bluetooth v4.1, and 3.5mm audio jack. It also sports an infrared sensor. It measures 139.2×69.6.x8.6mm, and weighs 150 grams. The Xiaomi Redmi 4 is powered by a 4100mAh battery.