Delhi University colleges announce fifth cutoff, 10% seats left for those yet to make the cut

Delhi University colleges released the fifth cutoff list for admissions on Monday, which saw most sought-after colleges close admissions to popular course choices.

With only about 10% of the seats still up for grabs, the cutoffs for the few seats that are still available at these colleges for the some of the more popular course choices has not dipped by more than a mark or two.

COMMERCE AND ECONOMICS:

Economics (Hons) has seen a dip of upto 3.5% points at Lakshmibai College, but is closed for admissions at most sought-after colleges such as Hans Raj College, and Indraprastha College for Women (IP College) in the fifth list. However, few seats have now become available at colleges such as Kirori Mal College (KMC) after withdrawals, where the cutoff is set at 96.5%.

Seats are still available at colleges like Ramjas College, Daulat Ram College, and Hindu College. Hindu College has set the highest cutoff for the course at 97.25%, which is the same as that in the fourth list.

Under the fifth list, BCom (Hons) has now closed at Ramjas College and Sri Venkateswara as well. However, the seats are still available at IP College, Gargi, Kamala Nehru and others. Most well known colleges have not reduced their cutoffs by more than 0.5% points.

Seats are still available at colleges like Ramjas College, Daulat Ram College, and Hindu College. Hindu College has set the highest cutoff for the course at 97.25%, which is the same as that in the fourth list.

HUMANITIES:

BA English (Hons) is now available again after withdrawals in colleges such as Hans Raj College and Kalindi College. It has, however, closed at Lady Shri Ram College (LSR), Ramjas College, and Maitreyi College under the fifth list.

The cutoffs for English (Hons) has also dropped by upto 3.5% points. The highest cutoff for English is at Miranda House, where the cutoff requirement is 95.75%, which is 0.5% points lower than that of the fourth list.

For History aspirants, seats have become available in the fifth list after withdrawals at colleges such as Kamala Nehru College, and the cutoff has dropped by up to 4% points. The highest cutoff for History is at LSR, which is the same as that in the fourth list, at 96.25%.

Seats for Political Science are also available at certain colleges such as Kamala Nehru College, Gargi College, and Ramjas College. Though the cutoff has dropped by up to 3% points, it has not dropped by more than a mark or two in most sought-after colleges that still have seats available. Ramjas has the highest cutoff with a requirement of 94.75%, which is only 0.25% points lower than the fourth list.

BA Programme is closed at most well known colleges. However, some such as IP College, Ramjas College, and Miranda House have a few seats remaining, with a cutoff requirement of 88.5%, 91.5%, and 93.25% respectively.

SCIENCES:

Chemistry (Hons) is still available at colleges like Gargi, Kalindi, and Hans Raj. However, the cutoff requirements have not dropped by more than 1% point.

IP College, Gargi, and Kamala Nehru have reopened admissions to Mathematics (Hons) after withdrawals.

DU admissions: Just 10% seats left, popular colleges finalising intake for courses

Admissions to merit-based undergraduate courses under the fourth cutoff list at Delhi University closed on Saturday, with admissions approved to almost 90% of the seats.

This may have been the last chance for many to get admitted to popular course choices in sought after colleges at DU, as many of them will be closing admissions to these courses.

DU has around 56,000 seats in its 60-odd constituent colleges, of which 50,000 seats are for merit-based undergraduate courses. Admissions to these seats are based on cutoffs .

By Saturday evening, admissions had been approved to almost 45,000 of these seats, and almost 42,000 students had paid their admission fees by 6 pm.

According to DU officials who are part of the admission process, almost 3,500 seats had been filled in the latest round of admissions, leaving only about 10% of the seats still vacant.

By Saturday evening, admissions had been approved to almost 45,000 of these seats, and almost 42,000 students had paid their admission fees by 6 pm.

Colleges such as Sri Venkateswara College have already admitted students beyond capacity. “We have approximately 1,150 seats, and we have approved 1,198 admissions. Almost all the courses will be closed for admissions, especially under the general category, in the next list,” said P Hemalatha Reddy, the principal.

Ramjas College too expects to close admissions to most of its courses, as they have less than 100 seats remaining at their institution. Kirori Mal College too has claimed that the fourth list would have been the last chance for many applicants, as most popular course choices will be closed.

However, Daulat Ram College claimed they still had around 150 seats remaining. “Even in sought after courses such as BCom, BCom (hons) and English (hons), we have a few seats remaining,” said Savita Roy, the principal.

For sciences, students may want to look to Sri Guru Teg Bahadur Khalsa College. “We have filled approximately 570 out of our 800 seats. Though most courses are going to be closed, we still have seats in the science courses,” said an associate professor.

The next cutoff list is expected to be released on Tuesday.

With only 10% seats remaining, popular DU colleges closing admissions to most courses

Admissions to merit-based undergraduate courses under the fourth cutoff list at Delhi University closed on Saturday, with admissions approved to almost 90% of the seats.

This may have been the last chance for many to get admitted to popular course choices in sought after colleges at DU, as many of them will be closing admissions to these courses.

DU has around 56,000 seats in its 60-odd constituent colleges, of which 50,000 seats are for merit-based undergraduate courses. Admissions to these seats are based on cutoffs .

By Saturday evening, admissions had been approved to almost 45,000 of these seats, and almost 42,000 students had paid their admission fees by 6 pm.

According to DU officials who are part of the admission process, almost 3,500 seats had been filled in the latest round of admissions, leaving only about 10% of the seats still vacant.

By Saturday evening, admissions had been approved to almost 45,000 of these seats, and almost 42,000 students had paid their admission fees by 6 pm.

Colleges such as Sri Venkateswara College have already admitted students beyond capacity. “We have approximately 1,150 seats, and we have approved 1,198 admissions. Almost all the courses will be closed for admissions, especially under the general category, in the next list,” said P Hemalatha Reddy, the principal.

Ramjas College too expects to close admissions to most of its courses, as they have less than 100 seats remaining at their institution. Kirori Mal College too has claimed that the fourth list would have been the last chance for many applicants, as most popular course choices will be closed.

However, Daulat Ram College claimed they still had around 150 seats remaining. “Even in sought after courses such as BCom, BCom (hons) and English (hons), we have a few seats remaining,” said Savita Roy, the principal.

For sciences, students may want to look to Sri Guru Teg Bahadur Khalsa College. “We have filled approximately 570 out of our 800 seats. Though most courses are going to be closed, we still have seats in the science courses,” said an associate professor.

The next cutoff list is expected to be released on Tuesday.

More medical colleges: Port hospitals to be teaching institutes, says Gadkari

New Delhi The government plans to convert existing hospitals at India’s major ports into medical colleges and super speciality centres on PPP basis, Union minister Nitin Gadkari said on Thursday.

“We will convert the existing hospitals at our ports into medical colleges and super speciality centres on a PPP basis,” shipping, road transport and highways minister Gadkari told PTI.

He said that a committee appointed by the government, headed by Medical Council of India (MCI) member Ved Prakash Mishra had submitted its report in this regard.

The seats in such medical colleges would depend on capacity, he added.

Road transport and highways minister Nitin Gadkari has said that the government will convert existing hospitals at Indian ports into medical colleges and super speciality centres on a PPP basis.

Citing an example, he said that the port hospital at Mumbai Port Trust would be converted into a 1,000-bed medical college while at some places it would be of 600 or 700 seats capacity, depending on the institute.

Gadkari said that a part of the funding would be met through the government while the rest will come from private players.

India has 12 major ports, namely Kandla, Mumbai, JNPT, Mormugao, New Mangalore, Kochi, Chennai, Ennore, V O Chidambaranar, Visakhapatnam, Paradip and Kolkata (including Haldia), which handle approximately 61 % of the country’s total cargo traffic.

Earlier, addressing an event at Assocham, he said the government had increased the length of National Highways from 96,000 km to 1.75 lakh km, upping its capacity to handle about 85%of the country’s total traffic.

He said the government was also focused on promoting alternative fuel to cut down on huge Rs 7 lakh crore import bills.

“We are going to bring in a policy to promote use of alternative fuel which is indigenous and pollution-free as it will help in saving lot of time, bring down logistics cost by 4 to 6%, which is currently about 14 to18% unlike in China where it is 10 to12% and in European countries where it is 12 to 14%,” he said.

 

More medical colleges: Port hospitals to be teaching institutes, says Gadkari

New Delhi The government plans to convert existing hospitals at India’s major ports into medical colleges and super speciality centres on PPP basis, Union minister Nitin Gadkari said on Thursday.

“We will convert the existing hospitals at our ports into medical colleges and super speciality centres on a PPP basis,” shipping, road transport and highways minister Gadkari told PTI.

He said that a committee appointed by the government, headed by Medical Council of India (MCI) member Ved Prakash Mishra had submitted its report in this regard.

The seats in such medical colleges would depend on capacity, he added.

Citing an example, he said that the port hospital at Mumbai Port Trust would be converted into a 1,000-bed medical college while at some places it would be of 600 or 700 seats capacity, depending on the institute.

Gadkari said that a part of the funding would be met through the government while the rest will come from private players.

India has 12 major ports, namely Kandla, Mumbai, JNPT, Mormugao, New Mangalore, Kochi, Chennai, Ennore, V O Chidambaranar, Visakhapatnam, Paradip and Kolkata (including Haldia), which handle approximately 61 % of the country’s total cargo traffic.

Road transport and highways minister Nitin Gadkari has said that the government will convert existing hospitals at Indian ports into medical colleges and super speciality centres on a PPP basis.

Earlier, addressing an event at Assocham, he said the government had increased the length of National Highways from 96,000 km to 1.75 lakh km, upping its capacity to handle about 85%of the country’s total traffic.

He said the government was also focused on promoting alternative fuel to cut down on huge Rs 7 lakh crore import bills.

“We are going to bring in a policy to promote use of alternative fuel which is indigenous and pollution-free as it will help in saving lot of time, bring down logistics cost by 4 to 6%, which is currently about 14 to18% unlike in China where it is 10 to12% and in European countries where it is 12 to 14%,” he said.

 

Students’ say to matter in NAAC accreditation of varsities, colleges

On the lines of educational institutions abroad, Indian students will now have a say in the assessment and accreditation of universities and colleges.

The National Assessment and Accreditation Council (NAAC) has revised its evaluation process under which it will now take direct feedback from students on the information submitted by educational institutions seeking accreditation.

Under the new evaluation process which has resumed on July 5 after being stopped in March, the institutions will prepare a self-study report (SSR) and upload it online for response and feedback from students.

“The report will be validated with the help of a student satisfaction survey by NAAC,” said a senior official at the Council.

NAAC is an autonomous body established by the University Grants Commission in 1994. The council, with its headquarters in Bengaluru, undertakes periodic assessment and accreditation of institutions of higher education and its units across the country.

NAAC introduced the reform after the union ministry of human resource development asked it to carry out a complete overhaul of the accreditation process.

“Through the new methodology, NAAC has made its assessment and accreditation process digitised and technology-driven lesser human intervention than before,” he added.

“The reform is aimed at bringing NAAC evaluation process at par with some of the best practices followed across the world and to put a check on institutions providing false information regarding manpower, infrastructure and facilities,” said senior professor at Allahabad University PK Sahoo, who has served as member in NAAC peer teams and is also a member of the northern regional committee of the National Council for Teachers’ Education (NCTE).

“I believe that the sudden shift should have been avoided. The new system should have been tested as a pilot project in select institutions and then it should have been introduced,” he said.

Sahoo added while taking students’ feedback was a welcome step, certain conditions like including only regular students should be ensured.

NAAC introduced the reform after the union ministry of human resource development asked it to carry out a complete overhaul of the accreditation process. The ministry has asked for the change in order to do away with corruption and subjectivity in the assessment and grading of higher education institutions.

Following the directives, NAAC had stopped accepting accreditation applications from March 31 as it went on the mission to improve its assessment and accreditation process.

The new methodology, which has been made more objective, gives only 20% weightage to peer team assessment instead of the earlier 100% in deciding the grade of an institution.

The new system provides 20% weightage to online student satisfaction survey (SSS) from this year for which institutions would have to provide email IDs of students for an online survey to be conducted by NAAC for the purpose.

Institutions will first prepare the self-study report and upload it online for response and feedback from students. It will then be validated with the help of student satisfaction survey.

The new process has been uploaded in the form of flow-chart on NAAC’s official website.

 

UGC urges universities, colleges to apply for innovation funding scheme AIC

New Delhi The University Grants Commission (UGC) has urged all public universities and the colleges under them to apply for aid from the Atal Incubation Centre (AIC), an innovation funding scheme formulated by the Niti Aayog last year.

In a letter issued on Wednesday, the central funding agency for the universities asked the latter to “encourage the academic fraternity of your esteemed University and your affiliated colleges” by applying to the scheme, which provides for a grant-in-aid of up to Rs 10 crore for a maximum period of five years.

The AIC is a scheme under Atal Innovation Mission, conceived to promote a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship.

“The AlCs would nurture innovative start-up businesses in their pursuit to become scalable and suitable enterprises to support enterprises in nationally relevant sectors such as manufacturing, transport, energy, health, education, agriculture, water and sanitation,” the UGC letter read.

This is the second such call made by the National Institution for Transforming India (NITI) Aayog for applications.

In the first call made last year, the Aayog had elicited a total of 3,658 applications — including from institutions in government and private sector, and academic and non-academic ventures — from across the country.

Out of this, ten applicants were selected for the aid.

The AIC is a scheme under Atal Innovation Mission, conceived to promote a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship.

The last date to apply for aid under AIC is July 31.

–IANS

DU admissions: 57% seats in various colleges full, 4th cut-off list on July 13

Nearly 57% of around 52,000 seats in undergraduate courses in various Delhi University colleges have been filled following the release of three cut-off lists by the varsity in a fortnight.

The varsity had on Friday released the third cut-off list with highest being 98% for BA (Honours) in Psychology course in Lady Shri Ram College for Women.

“Over 30,000 out of around 52,000 seats in various DU colleges have already been filled, along with payment of fees. Remaining seats will is most likely to be filled after release of other two cut-off lists,” chairman of DU’s Admissions Committee, Professor Maharaj K Pandit said.

Students wait in queue for submitting their documents for the new academic year 2017-18 at Hans Raj College in North Campus in New Delhi, on June 27, 2017.

The first and second cut-off lists were released on 23 June and 1 July respectively.

While seats for much preferred B.A.(Hons.) English and Economics courses were still open in various colleges, Shri Ram College of Commerce (SRCC), Lady Shri Ram (LSR) along with Hindu College has closed its admissions to some of the courses.

The fourth and the fifth lists are expected to be released on 13 and 18 July respectively.

No yoga, sports, no degree in engineering, technical colleges

Students of engineering colleges and technical institutes will have to take part in yoga, sports or other socially relevant activities in addition to their regular academics to be awarded a degree.

Earlier, the institutions had these activities, including National Social Service (NSS), National Cadet Corps (NCC) and the Unnat Bharat Abhiyan, but these were not compulsory for earning a degree.

Now, the All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE), which governs more than 10,000 institutions having over 18 lakh students, has made these mandatory.

Students will have to ensure 25% attendance in one of these activities although there won’t be any marks for their performance.

Officials said the move will help in the holistic development of students.

“Apart from studies, students need to do other activities too which is good for their well-being and for the society too,” a senior AICTE official said.

Welcoming the move, Pooja Sharma, a BTech student, said unless it is made mandatory, students will not take it up.

yoga

For example, under the government’s flagship Unnat Bharat Abhiyan, which aims to uplift rural India, students will have to visit villages and engage with the rural folk to learn from their lifestyle.

“By doing yoga or sports they can take care of their health,” the official said.

The all India boards of studies was considering incorporation of yoga and value addition to the curriculum of engineering courses, the HRD ministry had said recently.

Last month, the University Grants Commission (UGC) had asked all universities and colleges to prioritise the celebration of the International Yoga Day (IYD), and submit proof of activities undertaken by students and faculty for review.

Under the Unnat Bharat Abhiyan (UBA), the government aims to uplift rural India by enabling higher educational institutions to work with villages in identifying development challenges and finding solutions for enabling sustainable growth.

The NSS is a large-scale community service programme meant for the youth to engage with social problems and is run by universities across the country. Delhi University, for instance, took up the programme in 1969.

FYJC first merit list out: Wait, confusion end, admission process starts in Mumbai colleges

City colleges finally received the first admission merit list for FYJC after 11.15am on Tuesday, starting the admission process.

The list indicates cut-offs, the marks at which admissions close, across several colleges. The cut-off are slightly lower than last year’s​.

VG Vaze Kelkar college saw the science cut-off dip to 92.6% from 92.8%, while arts plunged to 83.8% from last year’s 85%.

Mumbai city news

The list was supposed to be released at 5pm on Monday, but students were able to view their results only after midnight. Colleges did not know their cut-offs in the morning because they couldn’t access the list.

On the instructions of the education department, colleges began admitting students in the morning on the basis of allotment messages received on their individual log in ID.

The department asked colleges to confirm admissions students by asking them to log in to the admissions portal in front of the college authorities and show the seat allocation message, which they received late at 1am on Tuesday.