Jojoba Oil Benefits: 7 Incredible Ways to Use it For Beautiful Skin and Hair

Jojoba oil is a great beauty ingredient. It is a natural oil extracted from the seed of the jojoba plant is is closest to the oil produced by the human skin called ‘sebum’ that helps protect and heal the skin from external toxins. It is the first defense barrier for the skin. Jojoba oil being the closest in construction to the human sebum is a natural replacement for it. When the body is unable to produce enough sebum to protect against harsh external elements, jojoba oil can be the perfect skincare solution.

Jojoba Oil Benefits: 7 Incredible Ways to Use it For Beautiful Skin and Hair

Jojoba oil contains essential vitamins for the skin such as Vitamin B, E and key minerals such as zinc, copper. In adulthood, your skin tends to produce lesser sebum hence making the skin dry and dull looking. Jojoba is a natural supplement that can be used for your regular skin care routine. Here are seven benefits of Jojoba oil which you probably didn’t know.

1. Retains moisture:

Jojoba oil helps retain moisture in the skin

thereby keeping the skin hydrated and looking fresh. Jojoba oil helps moisturize the skin, without clogging the pores, allowing for a healthy skin type. In addition, it also prevents the buildup of bacteria in the pores of the face, which tend to cause blackheads and breakout of acne.

skin care

2. For soft lips:

For fresh and soft lips, jojoba oil can be gently massaged on the lips to ensure no dryness and cracks.

3. Reduces wrinkles:

The essential vitamins present in Jojoba oil help greatly reduce wrinkles and the visible effects of ageing

. Since jojoba contains no harmful chemicals it can be used as part of one’s daily grooming routine.

4. A natural sunscreen:

Jojoba oil is also applied on the full body, which makes it a good natural alternative to harsh sun screen creams

.

sunscreen

5. Treats skin burns:

Jojoba soothes any burnt skin by going deeper into the tissues and healing them, this helps the pain after a sunburn or tan. With its natural healing properties Jojoba oil is helpful in reducing skin burns during shaving.

6. Good for your hair:

Jojoba oil helps strengthen hair follicles on the scalp causing hair to grow stronger and healthier. The presence of Vitamin E & B conditions the hair shaft making the hair shinier, adding volume and density. The stronger hair shaft prevents hair breakage due to drying wet hair every day. Head massages with jojoba oil help to also condition the scalp which removes scalp dryness. Thus avoiding dandruff and itching.

hair 620

7. Great make-up remover

: In addition to all its amazing all round applications jojoba oil can be used as an effective and natural makeup remover.

All you need to do is take a few drops of the oil on a cotton sob and simply glide it to remove stubborn eye shadow and kohl.

Soups For Monsoons: 5 Ways to Drive Away the Chill and Stay Strong

One look at the stormy showers outside the window, and the thought of piping hot pakodas, samosas and a hot cup of tea comes to mind almost instantly. And why not, after sweating it out for two months, binging on crunchy fried delicacies seems like the reward we all deserve and had been waiting for. But sadly, the damp weather also makes one susceptible to several diseases associated with the monsoon season like cold and flu, throat infections and tummy problems. Your immunity levels tend to be low during seasonal change and your body becomes vulnerable to catch infections. The excess of moisture in the air make it perfect for bacteria and microorganism to breed and this can hamper our ability to process foods and our metabolism tends to slow down. Due to this, our digestion and immunity is compromised severely.

To counter this, you need to fortify yourself from within with the maximum inflow of vitamins. A bowl of piping hot soup can come in handy to make you feel strong and at the same time it offers protection. It keeps your body hydrated and can also be a good source of protein. The flavourful toppings of of garlic, onions, and ginger impart a warm feel and keep you snug as the weather becomes a bit chilly. Talking about the health benefits of having soups, they may help to de-clog your nasal passages and also promote increased secretions which helps in flushing out bacteria and viruses.

Soups For Monsoons: 5 Ways to Drive Away the Chill and Stay Strong

Bangalore-based Nutritionist Dr. Anju Sood tells us, “Our immunity system tends to take a dip during this season. We are more prone to infections and therefore, our bodies need a constant flow of vitamins and minerals. Soups are great ways to load up on all the nutrition. However, I would advise to go for clear soups over the thick cream-based ones.” According to Meher Rajput, Nutritionist at FITPASS, “Mushrooms are loaded with vitamin D and antioxidants which play a role in building your immunity. You can use them in a hot mushroom soup. Also, chicken and mutton soups are good to derive strength as they are high in protein.” Here are a few healthy soup ingredients that you must experiment with.

 

1. Mushrooms: They are full of B Vitamins, Vitamin D and antioxidants. B vitamins have been linked with healthy immune functions. They are also rich in selenium- a mineral touted to alleviate the risk of severe infections. Mushrooms are a great source of proteins as they contain all 17 essential amino acids required by the body.

 

2. Meat and Fish: Whether it’s chicken, mutton or fish and seafood, all of them are rich in protein. Not only does our body need protein to build and repair its tissues, but it also plays a vital role in boosting white blood cells that are responsible for fighting infections. Meat also supplies Vitamin B, zinc and iron. Omega-3 fatty acids (from fish and seafoods) is also an essential component in keeping up the body’s defense mechanism.

 

3. Dark and Leafy Vegetables: Leafy greens like cabbage, spinach and broccoli are high in vitamins A, C and E, as well as folate, antioxidants and fibre. Try and include them in soups with a hint of aromatic spices.

 

4. Spices: Load up on immunity boosting and anti-inflammatory spices like turmeric, mustard, asafoetida (hing), coriander, turmeric, fenugreek (methi), cloves, pepper, cinnamon, garlic, ginger and curry leaves. They not only add a fresh flavour to your soups, but also boost your immunity and aid digestion.

 

Here are few interesting soup recipes you can try at home this monsoon.

 

1. Spiced Spinach Soup with Cottage Cheese Croutons Recipe
Recipe by Chef Vicky Ratnani

 

A good old spinach soup loaded with the goodness of fenugreek leaves, mustard seeds, turmeric powder and topped with crispy cottage cheese croutons.

spinach soup 625

2. Bhutte Ka Shorba
Recipe by Chef Kunal Kapoor

 

A nutritious and wholesome stew, packed with the season’s favourite – corn and a whole lot of aromatic spices.

bhutte ka shorba

Bhutte Ka Shorba

3.Seared Mushrooms and Chicken Broth Recipe
Recipe By Chef Jaydeep Mukherjee

 

A sumptuous broth made with the goodness of chicken and a great variety of mushrooms – button, shiitake, shimeji, enoki, and chanterelle. Wholesome and satisfying.

mushroom broth

4.Tibettan Chicken Broth
Recipe by Chef Aditya Bal

 

An authentic Tibetan broth, made with succulent chicken pieces simmered in a flavourful broth with fresh vegetables and spices.

chicken soup

5.Chimney Soup
Recipe By Chef Andy Sharma

 

Easy and quick to prepare, this soul-stirrer is a must try. It makes for an ideal light supper with the goodness chicken, fish and spinach.

chimney soup

Make these soups fresh at home and enjoy them on a chilly evening. Aren’t these the simple pleasures of life?

 

No Ordinary Cooks: The Rise and Decline of the Tradition of Khansamas

It is somewhat ironical that in this day of celebrity chefdom, khansamas, the original traditional professional cooks or chefs in many parts of the country, should have so totally disappeared. But this disappearance is perhaps inevitable. The khansamas were a product of a feudal India, of the British Raj, and while their legacy lived on for many decades post-Independence, and post the abolition of the privy purses which dealt a death blow to feudalism in many ways, in the post Liberalisation world, it was inevitable that this legacy would wane which is a pity because these were no ordinary cooks. They were master chefs who, despite being professionally untrained, cooked with an instinct for flavours and spicing that cannot be taught to students of Indian gastronomy.

Most of us who grew up at the cusp of Liberalisation can perhaps recall the last of the khansamas from old clubs in old cities. Some of us may even have been privileged to be part of extended families of some affluence and influence who employed these professional cooks. But how did the institution of the khansama-in the erstwhile dak bunglows, bureaucratic homes, Railways catering, army messes and elite clubs come about?

No Ordinary Cooks: The Rise and Decline of the Tradition of Khansamas

Much of it can be traced to Avadh – that glittering center piece of cultural and culinary evolution in the post-Mughal times. Abdul Halim Sharar (1860-1926), the best known chronicler of the lifestyle and culture of Avadh writes extensively about the Nawabi preoccupation with food and the exalted status enjoyed by cooks in their kitchens.

In Guzishta Lucknow, the finest narrative describing the Lucknow  of the past, Sharar not only talks about the splendours produced in the Nawabi kitchens-Rs 60,000 a month were spent on food apart from salaries of various cooks-where cuisine was raised to the form of art, but he also talks about the categories of cooks. While a bawarchi was an ordinary cook, cooking in bulk (that legacy has survived till today and you have bawarchis cooking up biryani, curries or working the tandoor for big fat Indian weddings), his profession was looked down upon by elite Lucknowwallahs

as being commonplace. Rakabdars, on the other hand, were the true master chefs, and highly regarded.

They only cooked small portions of food for the main aristocrats (and not the entire household) and devoted their time to refining dishes, developing preserves, procuring the best ingredients and artistically decorating plates! Somewhat like the head chef in a modern restaurant kitchen that runs on the French model. Instead of following a recipe, Rakabdars were instinctive geniuses who created novel dishes out of existing ingredients-a dry fruit only khichdi without dal and chawal, sliced aubergines, delicately spiced, put on trees, murabbas, rich desserts, you get the drift.

Since cuisine was entertainment and the entire culture favoured hyperbole and elaborate manners (as has been often caricatured), nazakat and nafasat – delicacy and elegance– were equally prized in the culinary arts too. Thus we have the legacy of paans fashioned out of just malaipulaos rather than robust biryanis and aromats in minute quantities to rev up kebab and kormas as well as paheli ka khana

— to trick your senses-much before the age of Heston Blumenthal.

After the Revolt of 1857, when the last Nawab of Avadh Wajid Ali Shah was exiled to Kolkata, capital of the British Raj, hundreds of cooks employed in the extended household traveled east with him. These were cooks of all categories. Some of them or their progeny, it is conjectured, found employment with the British clubs and in the homes of the memsahibs, some turned bazaar chefs, but all of them, no doubt, contributed to the inventive cuisine that we know today-aloo dum, mochar

chops, Calcutta biryani which is a take on the avadhi biryani and, well, smoked hilsa, that ultimate aspirational dish. The khansamas were inventing a whole new genre of food with newer influences married to local ingredients and spicing.

Before we talk further about the khansamas and their influence on Indian gastronomy, a peep into the legacy of another traditional Indian cook: the padayan. While the khansamas were at least originally muslim cooks proficient in old Mughalai khana, employed by aristocrats, bureaucrats, landlords given to entertaining and in clubs and messes of British India, padayans were also professional cooks, only more homely and matronly.

Most ordinary high-caste Hindu homes in UP and large parts of the Gangetic heartland employed these Brahmin women to cook in their inner kitchens. Padayans would make everyday fare, slaving over the fire, turning out hot phulkas and paranthe, ghee-laden dals and seasonal vegetables and curries. This was every day fare but the padayan ruled the kitchen with an iron fist. Economy was maintained, no meat (in some regions, fish was not taboo) was allowed into this inner space governed by religious rituals of cooking and eating.

The khansamas, by contrast, cooked fare meant for entertaining. Their cooking then was naturally more inventive and eventually became the basis of restaurant/club cooking in India, though of course, over the years some of the dishes became part of the “party” fare in homes as well. If there is such a sharp divide between home-style, “regular” Indian food and what we eat outside, it is also because of these differences in cooks.

If the Rakabdars in Lucknow-and similar cooks in other princely states-excelled in turning out exotic dishes with expensive ingredients, khansamas of the British Raj employed in dak bungalows and clubs in the boondocks invented with what they had. Dak Bungalow curries and the like come nowhere close to the refinement of a korma but the khansamas were no rakabdars and their context had changed. Still, that same instinct for invention and experimentation survived. That is exactly what defines Indian cuisines even today – this melange of different influences on our tables.

Caffeine May Improve Breathing Ability and Lung Function in Premature Babies: Study

In the time when nutritionists and experts are debating how much of coffee in a day is good or bad, a recent Australian based study has demonstrated that a limited caffeine intake by premature babies may improve their lung function in later life.

 

The study shows that caffeine acts as respiratory stimulant that may improve short-term breathing rates in infants. In the study a regulated portion of caffeine, helped them perform slightly better in tests that measure their ability to breathe out later in life. The findings also found that the infants were also significantly better at exhaling during a forced breath.

coffee beans 625

In the study Melbourne Royal Women’s Hospital doctors examined the development of over 140 premature babies (under ten days), half of whom were given a dose of caffeine once a day, over 11 years, and half of them were given a placebo. The trial participants were checked at 18 months and five years, with the group that received caffeine found to have a better breathing ability at the age of 11, than the other group. The caffeine was given to the infants with milk through a tube or as an injection, once daily.

 

Lead author of the study, Dr Lex Doyle explained that caffeine belongs to a group of drugs known as methylxanthines. This group of drugs has the ability to reduce apnea of prematurity, a condition in which the baby stops breathing for many seconds.

A yo-yo diet or weight cycling can harm your heart, metabolism and cause depression. Here’s how

When home-maker and mother Karishma Sharma (35) was trying to lose weight, she tried different kinds of diets. While some were low in calorie, others required her to consume only protein-rich food. While she lost a few pounds initially, over a period of time, Sharma’s body stopped reacting to all form of dieting.

Sharma is among a host of people who end up opting for unhealthy and extreme fad diets to lose weight. This phenomenon is referred to as yo-yo dieting or weight cycling where you lose and then regain at least 5 to 10 pounds of weight repeatedly.

As with other diets, celebrities are also guilty of promoting this kind of weight loss. Singers Christina Aguilera and Mariah Carey, actor Chris Pratt, and talk show host Oprah Winfrey are among several celebs who have been in the spotlight for weight cycling.

Controlling food portion sizes and eating fruits and vegetables are a better way to lose weight. (Shutterstock)

In the past, there has been conflicting studies on the topic. While a study by Ohio University reported that it is better to attempt to lose weight despite repeated failures, experts also warned that such dieting fads cause grave damage to physical and mental health. Most experts caution that this type of dieting leads to health issues such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and cancer.

Dr Vinny Makhijani, senior dietitian, Masina Hospital says that yo-yo dieting can actually be more hazardous than being overweight. “Most weight cyclers eventually gain back more weight than they had lost because the shame and stress involved with gaining weight can lead to eating more. It also damages the heart; women who were weight cyclers had a great risk of heart disease beginning shortly after menopause,” says Makhijani.

Nutritionist Anjali Peswani elaborates on some more effects of this diet: “It can disturb the hormones and interfere with our absorption and digestion of food. It creates havoc in your hormones thus affecting your metabolism which is directly proportional to weight loss,” says Peswani.

And the effects are not just physical; it can impact your mental health as well. “Studies have reported that yo-yo dieting can increase the risk for mental distress and depression,” says Makhijani.

Both experts agree that yo-yo dieting has become increasingly common today as people seek a quick fix without making lifestyle changes. Instead of jumping from diet to diet and facing erratic weight loss, Peswani suggests a way out: “Don’t go overboard with anything, be it your workouts or your diet. Have control on the portion sizes and eat till you are 80% full. When eating out, stick to one dish only.”

Makhijani also advises a gradual way of losing weight: “Lose weight through a consistent loss of 1 kg per week. Consume non-starchy vegetables and fruits, moderate amounts of lean protein and dairy products, legumes and whole grains, and few or no refined carbohydrates and saturated fats.”

Ditch the artificial sweetener. It may increase risk of obesity and heart disease

Artificial sweeteners are substitutes for sugar that provides a sweet taste like that of sugar while containing significantly less food energy. Previous research has found that consuming artificial sweeteners may up diabetes risk. Many believe that it helps you minimise your calorie intake, but it has also been proven that instead of cutting back calories, it makes you eat more. Now, new research has linked artificial sweeteners with long-term weight gain and increased risk of obesity.

The findings showed that artificial sweeteners or non-nutritive sweeteners may have negative effects on metabolism, gut bacteria and appetite. Thus, individuals consuming artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame, sucralose and stevia, may also be at risk of developing high blood pressure and heart disease, the researchers from University of Manitoba in Canada, said.

The long-term health effects of artificial sweeteners are not yet fully known.

According to researchers, the use of artificial sweeteners which is widespread and increasing is linked with the current epidemic of obesity and related diseases. For the study, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), the team conducted a randomised controlled trials involving 1,003 people followed for six months on average. The trials did not show a consistent effect of artificial sweeteners on weight loss, and the longer observational studies showed a link between consumption of artificial sweeteners and relatively higher risks of weight gain and obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease and other health issues.

“We found that data from clinical trials do not clearly support the intended benefits of artificial sweeteners for weight management,” said Ryan Zarychanski, assistant professor at the University of Manitoba. “Caution is warranted until the long-term health effects of artificial sweeteners are fully characterised,” added Meghan Azad, assistant professor, at the University.

Want to improve your health? Do gardening, join walking groups and cooking clubs

Turns out, you can benefit from a medically prescribed, slow and progressive approach to physical fitness.

Gyms, walking groups, gardening, cooking clubs and volunteering have all been shown to work in improving the health and well-being reported by a group of people with long-term conditions. Key to the success was a ‘Link Worker,’ who helped participants select their activities and supported them throughout the programme.

The in-depth Newcastle University study shows how social prescribing of non-medical activities helps people with long term health conditions. Researcher Suzanne Moffatt said that the findings demonstrated that social prescribing, such as offering someone with heart disease the opportunity to take part in a gardening club, does work.

“People who took part in the study said social prescribing made them more active, it helped them lose weight and they felt less anxious and isolated, as a result they felt better,” she noted, adding, “This is the first time that these kind of non-medical interventions have been fully analysed for physical health problems and the results are very encouraging.” Moffat continued, “What the study also highlighted was the importance of a specific individual, a Link Worker, to help people with issues such as welfare benefits, debt, housing – so they were helping with the whole life and lifestyle which was shown to improve the person’s health and well-being.”

Ways to Wellness has provided social prescribing with the support of dedicated Link Workers since its launch in April 2015. The study is based on interviews with thirty people from the 2,400 people who have used the service since its started. The participants reported how they had been deeply affected, physically, emotionally and socially by their health problems. They detailed physical effects including pain, sleep problems, side-effects of medication and significant problems functioning and many explained how this had led to depression and anxiety and how their problems had worsened as they got older.

In the interviews they explained how working with a Link Worker to find the right activity and to get support in dealing with financial problems had built self-confidence, self -reliance and independence. Activities such as gardening, dance clubs and voluntary work helped them lose weight and increase fitness leading to people managing the pain and tiredness better. It also led to them feeling less socially isolated and impacted positively on self-esteem and mental well-being.

Activities such as gardening, dance clubs and voluntary work helped people lose weight and increase fitness leading to them managing their pain and tiredness better.

Ways to Wellness covers the west of Newcastle, including 17 GP practices where 18 % of residents have long-term conditions and receive sickness and disability-related benefits. People who have asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes (Type 1 or Type 2), heart disease, epilepsy, osteoporosis (thinning of the bones) and any of these conditions with depression and/or anxiety are eligible for the scheme. The Link Worker also helps patients to access other support, services and local activities. The study was published in BMJ Open.

Running on sand is good for your heart and legs. Here’s how to do it right

As a seasonal alternative to pounding pavements or gym treadmills, running on sandy seashores is a good way to train while on vacation while also boosting motivation with a change of scenery. Here’s a look at some of the advantages of running on the beach and how to get ready to hit the sand.

What are the benefits?
Running on sand is an excellent way of diversifying your running experience or workout regime while keeping injury risk and impact to a minimum. Unlike concrete and hard surfaces, sand cushions the foot’s impact on the ground, creating fewer shockwaves that can damage the body’s musculoskeletal structure. It’s therefore easier on joints in the knee and foot, as well as tendons, making them less vulnerable to injury or tendonitis.

Wet or dry sand also creates an unstable surface, which helps to naturally strengthen the muscles that support and stabilise ankles. The muscles will have to work harder to help you gain speed, using more energy.

For beginners, it is better to run on wet sand, which is more compact and requires less intense effort than running on soft, dry sand. (Shutterstock)

Running barefoot on the beach or in the sea – up to mid-calf depth – also helps improve the flow of blood back to the heart, as well as blood circulation, and reduces feelings of heavy legs.

Running up dunes or hills is an excellent way of making muscles and ligaments work harder while also increasing cardiovascular intensity. Just be careful not to strain knees and ankles.

How to prepare

Stick to the same warm-up you use all year round when running in the park, in town or the woods, for example. Build up progressively, starting with gentle sessions on flat terrain and increasing the intensity and the distance little by little.

Running barefoot is perfectly possible and pleasant, so long as the beach is clean and doesn’t have too many pebbles or shells. You can also alternate sessions, with some runs barefoot in water or along the shore, and others wearing running shoes.

Unlike concrete and hard surfaces, sand cushions the foot’s impact on the ground, creating fewer shockwaves that can damage the body’s musculoskeletal structure.

For beginners, it is better to run on wet sand, which is more compact and requires less intense effort than running on soft, dry sand. Note that running on sand is quite different to running in a city or park. Don’t expect to keep the same pace. Steps feel harder and become more tiring more quickly on sand. Make sure you stretch after each session too.

Watch out for high temperatures and the lack of shade when running on the beach. Make sure you stay hydrated, drinking enough water to avoid heatstroke. Protect your skin with a suitable sunscreen and head out wearing a t-shirt, a hat and sunglasses. It’s better to run in the morning or at sunset when it’s less hot and the beach is quieter.

A fresh coat of paint, better plumbing and drinking water: How 5 teachers gave a Rajasthan school, and its students, a new life

When she joined the Girls’ Upper Primary School (GUPS) in Alwar’s Shivaji Park in December 2016, Hemlata Sharma, 47, had been teaching for 27 years. This was her first posting as head teacher and never before had she been so appalled by the condition of the school.

Classrooms leaked in the rain, plaster peeled off the wall. The entire building was in a state of disrepair and housed just 100 students from classes 1 to 8.

Sharma took up a challenge to bring the school back to life before the next academic session in July and roped in four other teachers for support.

Pleasing seating areas, space for interaction: The old school now is all bright and cheerful (HT Photo)

Within four months, things changed – the walls were painted in bright colours, the classrooms spruced up and a lawn laid out in front. An underground rainwater recharge tank, an RO plant for drinking water, and new furniture in all classrooms were also added. Leakages were plugged.

Just 15 days after schools opened, enrolment went up to 202. Some admissions were pending clearance for lack of Aadhaar and birth certificates.

Sharma was also determined to do something about Rajasthan’s high school dropout rate. The 2016 Annual Status of Education Report survey of schooling and learning levels in rural India ranks the state among the top three with the highest dropout rates in children aged 11 to 14 (5% among all-India average of 3.5%). To get more children to her school, she turned to her family for donation to start repairs.

A garden has been laid out for the children to play in. (HT Photo)

“I asked my sisters, brother and father for money and collected Rs 40,000 from them. After that I went to my teachers,” said Sharma, who added Rs 11,000 from her savings into the school renovation kitty.

Manju Rani Sharma, who retired on May 31, donated Rs 21,000 as a parting gift to the school. Three other teachers – Sanika Sharma, Sashi Singhal and Kavita Sharma – also donated to take the teachers’ contribution Rs 51,000.

After collecting about Rs 1 lakh, the teachers began work. For changing the infrastructure, Sharma met district Sarv Shiksha Abhiyan officials, who, impressed by her efforts, sanctioned Rs 2 lakh more.

Sanika Sharma, who will retire in June next year, said they approached philanthropists in town for furniture in classrooms and free uniforms for students.

On June 8 this year, the teachers distributed among 170 students a new uniform set and a pair of shoes and socks.

Clean water, waste disposal – the school has now got new, upgraded facilities. (HT Photo)

“It was on that day that I proposed to my colleagues that teachers should wear uniform to school to enforce discipline – and the teachers agreed,” said Sharma.

Now the students wear brown trousers and skirts and light brown shirts, and the teachers wear off-white salwar and dupatta and maroon kurta.

Two teenagers who passed Class 12 recently come in regularly to teach junior school students to make up for shortage of teachers. “Parul and Priyanka, twin daughters of school management committee president Kusum Rohilla, are coming to school since June 22 after two of the five teachers got transferred out,” the head teacher said.

The two girls are in the first year of college.

Recently, Imran Khan from Alwar, who was lauded by PM Narendra Modi at London’s Wembley Stadium in 2015 for creating apps for the benefit of students, got the school four computers and a printer.

Delhi Police, college students and authorities brace for day one of Delhi University

The new academic session at Delhi University (DU) begins on July 20. And freshers have mixed feelings — nervousness about whether they’ll ‘fit in’ and excitement to step into a more chilled-out phase of their lives. Some even fear being bullied. But here’s what: From the various college authorities and societies to student political parties and even the Delhi Police, everyone is working towards ensuring a smooth run for the anxious fuchchas.

“We’ll welcome the freshers with chocolates and roses, and brief them about the syllabus and course details, as there are minor changes in the syllabus every year that freshers don’t usually know of,” says Shauryaveer Singh, a student of Campus Law Centre and a member of National Students’ Union of India (NSUI).

Picture for representational purpose only.

For safety and a ragging-free campus, the student political wing has made a list of locations where CCTV cameras are required. “University is planning to install cameras in the campus premises and have asked for recommendations as to where they should be installed. We have noted down 23 locations to ensure security, especially for the girls,” adds Singh.

Some drama always helps! So, besides orientation programmes, fuchchas can expect anti-ragging plays on campus. Dr Rama, principal of Hans Raj College, shares, “The seniors students will stage plays on the anti-ragging theme. A committee of teachers will also monitor the college premises.” She adds, “No one will be able to bully anyone and if any student faces any issue, they can contact me without any hesitation.”

Above all, Delhi Police plans to tighten vigilance. “We will deploy more female officers, dressed in casuals, in the campus. Women helpdesks will be established at Arts Faculty, Miranda House, Ramjas College, Kirori Mal College and Hans Raj College. We will coordinate with the anti-ragging committees of each college and department,” says Jatin Narwal, Deputy Commissioner of Police (North).

More so, “the Delhi Metro has been requested to make announcements in trains and stations about DU being intolerant towards ragging,” reads a release issued by the varsity.