From a Street Food to an Exotic Dish: The Interesting Tale of Sushi

A night out at the most exquisite fine dining restaurants in the city, we are always compelled to order a portion of sushi. With a multitude of options available, one or the other kind always manages to occupy a place on the table. These rice rolls are not only healthy; they are scrumptious and addictive too. The popularity stems from the fact that it is a simple dish with raw seafood and rice, yet manages to attract so much attention.

sushi 620x350Photo Credit: The Leela Mumbai

The inception

 

Did you know that sushi was first created with a purpose to keep meat fresh in the absence of refrigeration? By keeping raw fish folded in rice, its freshness could be preserved for over months. This was the main purpose when sushi was invented in Southeast Asia back in the second century A.D. It is hard to believe that preservation of seafood was the main aim of this rather exotic dish. By allowing the fish to ferment in rice over a period of time, it was made edible. The rice was then thrown away, while the fish was eaten. Just like all things ancient, the origin of sushi is not free of old wives tales and folklore.

How did sushi get its name? Tracing its trajectory is as fascinating as the name sushi itself is. It is believed that the word sushi literally means ‘it is sour’ which is used to describe the ancient process of making sushi,with raw seafood rolled into rice along with salt for facilitating the fermentation process.

Gradually, the preservation method was discovered in China and Japan, where Japan went a step further. Today, Japan has the most exciting night life and back then, there were significant transformations taking place. With Edo as the Capital of Japan, entrepreneurs developed quicker ways to prepare the sushi. Vinegar aided the process. The Japanese began eating the rice along with the fish. It was Matsumoto Yoshiichi of Tokyo who began to add vinegar in his sushi to sell it. This allowed the customers to eat it immediately rather than waiting for the process of fermentation to start. This why the sushi kitchen is called tsuke-ba or “pickling place.” The process of fermenting the rice releases acid that allow the fish to last longer.

The evolution

Hanaya Yohei is known to be responsible for the shift in the way sushi was originally presented and prepared. Before him, in the 1820’s, chefs used raw fish in their sushi, known as ‘Edo-style’ sushi. This is the style you will find in most sushi restaurants. Then, Yohei began a method where by rather than wrapping the fish in rice, he began to place the fish on top of the roll and that is exactly the way we eat Japanese sushi today. It is also commonly referred to as ‘nigiri sushi’. At his time, it was a fast food available on the streets. He set up his stall on the banks of the Sumida river, this meant that sushi could be prepared within minutes rather than hours or days. You could be on the go and fill yourself with a box of freshly prepared sushi. It was slowly being favored and is now one of the most widely ordered dishes.

sushi 620x350

Photo Credit: Istock

How did it make its way into fine dining restaurants?

The aftermath of the World War 2 and a massive earthquake in Tokyo in the 1920s changed the scenario in Japan. Land prices decreased significantly. You would no longer get sushi on your casual stroll across the street. It shifted to fine dining restaurants that desired more formal clothing and few more hours of your time. The earthquake also displaced numerous chefs to set up their bases across the country, increasing the popularity of sushi.

 

Transcending geographical boundaries for the art that sushi making has become, the west slowly adapted the artistry. The booming post-war economy could support mass refrigerators, better transportation of seafood and fine dining restaurants that allowed the sushi industry to thrive.
Today, Japan’s iconic street food, has become a sophisticated and unique dish globally. Upscale sushi restaurants are creating fusion forms, inventing and innovating at a rapid rate to meet customer needs.

sushi

Photo Credit: Istock

Chefs across the world attempted to embrace the sushi culture. With western influence, cut rolls that have been wrapped in seaweed or soy paper have become extremely popular. Vegetarians too have no reason to complain with toppings and fillings like mushrooms, cucumbers, avocado and asparagus.

 

The Japananse pay a lot of attention to the presentation of food. The presentation is almost as important as the taste itself and that’s what makes sushi an art and an experience. Owing to the mysterious, yet elusive background of sushi,  Yohei’s contribution is credible and unforgettable. In the absence of advancement of technology, his foresightedness is believed to have transformed the world of sushi. We can now state with conviction that sushi is here to stay.

7 Creative Kachori Fillings You Must Try this Monsoon

Kachori is a famous street food snack which is perfect for the monsoon season. It is golden and flaky and is loaded with a special filling that may vary from state to state. These heavenly bites, deep fried in hot oil and sometimes in desi ghee, are perfect to gorge on a rainy day. In Uttar Pradesh, it is enjoyed as a popular breakfast item and is generally eaten with aloo ki sabziand raita. Kachori is believed to have been created and popularized by the Marwaris in Rajasthan. A typical kachori is filled with a spicy mix of moong dal and urad dal

, but over the years, people have experimented with many other fillings which are equally delicious. Here are some of the most popular types of kachoris with different fillings that you must try this monsoon.

 

7 Creative Kachori Fillings You Must Try this Monsoon

1. Pyaz ki Kachori

 

Pyaz ki Kachori is a traditional snack from Rajasthan. You would find these kachoris in every nook and corner of the cities across the state. It is believed that the Pyaz ki Kachori was first made in Jodhpur and eventually became popular in other cities. This spicy kachori is filled with onions, kalonji, bay leaves, coriander leaves, garam masala, green chillies and fennel seeds and fried in ghee. This kachori tastes brilliant with saunth, a sweet and spicy tamarind chutney.

 

Where to Find: Rawat Kachori, Jaipur

 

2. Paneer ki Kachori

 

Paneer ki kachori is popular in Uttar Pradesh. It is generally eaten for breakfast along with coriander chutney or aloo ki sabzi. It is filled with lots of paneer, asafoetida, chaat masala, coriander powder, garam masala and cumin seeds. It is also great with your evening cup of tea.

 

3. Hare Chane ki Kachori

 

Hara chana makes for a delicious filling in a kachori. The kachoris are usually made with wheat flour and stuffed with hara chana, ginger, coriander leaves, green chili and various spices. The filling becomes a little dry and therefore, people like to savour it with raita or spiced yogurt.

 

4. Dry Fruit Kachori or Mawa Kachori

 

Dry fruit Kachori or Mawa Kachori is a sweet version of the kachori. It is believed that the Mawa Kachori was invented by a halwai named Shri Rawatmal Ji Deora of Rawat Mishthan Bhandar in Jodhpur. It is made with dry fruits like cashew nuts, almonds, walnuts and pistachios and lots of khoya (mawa). It is fried in desi ghee and then dipped in sugar syrup.

 

Where to Find: Rawat Mishthan Bhandar, Jodhpur

 

5. Spicy Masala Kachori

 

This one is a regional favourite from Gujarat and like all the other Gujarati delicacies it has a sweet and salty flavour. It is made with a spiced dough which is filled with peanuts, clove powder, cardamom powder and coconut and is fried till crisp.

Where to Find: Shivam Snacks, Rajkot

 

6. Matar Ki Kachori

 

It is stuffed with sweet green peas mixed with spices. Matar ki Kachori is also known as ‘Vatana Ni Kachori’ in Gujarat. These are not as crisp but absolutely delicious. They should be paired with coriander chutney and tamarind chutney to add a mix of sweet and tangy flavours.

Where to Find: Shyam Sweets, Chawri Bazaar, Delhi

 

7. Aloo ki Kachori

 

Loaded with a flavourful mix of mashed potatoes, Aloo Kachoris are served with mango pickle, coriander chutney and sliced onions. Boiled potatoes are mixed with some spices and then rolled and stuffed into the wheat flour dough and which is then fried. In Uttar Pradesh, it is often known as the ‘Khasta Kachori’.

 

Where to Find: Bajpai Kachodi Bhandar, Lucknow

Head to your nearest spot to try their heavenly kachoris that are best enjoyed in this weather with a hot cup of tea.

 

9 Best Vegetarian Restaurants in Mumbai

Vegetarianism has become the new mantra for a healthy lifestyle. With the changing dynamics, our palates have evolved and we’ve always looking out for something interesting and unique. Chefs are now experimenting and using their creativity to woo their vegetarian customers. So, if you have ever thought that there are very few vegetarian options on the menu, you’ll be surprised. Aamchi Mumbai has a treasure trove of vegetarian restaurants that serve international and regional dishes using a variety of cooking styles and exotic ingredients. Here’s a list of the 10 best vegetarian restaurants in Mumbai.

9 Best Vegetarian Restaurants in Mumbai

1. Burma Burma

 

This restaurant calls out to all Burmese food lovers. Burma Burma is known for its authentic vegetarian food from the region that’s to die for. They’ll often use ingredients that you may have never had before. Don’t leave without trying their Khau Suey, Red Chilli Noodles, Manadalay Meeshay and Chocolate Hazelnut Dome.

 

Where: Kothari House, Allana Centre Lane, MG Road, Behind Mumbai University, Fort, Mumbai
Cost for Two: INR 1500 (approximately)
Contact: 022 61054592

burma burma 620

2. Tuskers

 

If you want a fine dining experience, Tuskers is your perfect bet. Serving authentic Gujarati and Rajasthani dishes, this restaurant is bound to make you fall in love. The menu has an array of regional dishes ranging from Gatte ki Sabzi, Dal Ka Halwa to desserts like Paan Kulfi along with a lavish Gujarati Thali.

 

Where: Sofitel Hotel, C 57, Bandra Kurla Complex, Mumbai
Cost for Two: INR 3000 (approximately)
Contact: 022 61175000

rajasthani thali

3. Soam

 

If you want to have the most authentic Gujarati food in Mumbai, Soam is the best deal. A simple and not-so-fancy restaurant, Soam boasts of its regional specialities that include Moong Dal Khichu, Farsan Platter, Jowar Pita Pockets, special Gujarati thali and desserts like Malpua. If you haven’t been here already, it’s time you visit it now.

 

Where: Ground Floor, Sadguru Sadan, Opposite Babulnath Temple, Chowpatty, Mumbai
Cost for Two: INR 700 (approximately)
Contact: 022 23698080

gujarati thali 620x350

4. Revival

 

Revival’s simple yet aesthetic ambience is bound to make you fall in love with the place. The food served here only adds to the fun. It boasts of a menu full of North Indian food, especially Rajasthani delicacies served with a twist like Bhindi Rajasthani, Paneeralay, Makai Malai Seekh and Barabanki Kofta.

 

Where: 39-B, Chowpatty Seaface, Chowpatty, Mumbai
Cost for Two: INR 900 (approximately)
Contact: 022 2369699

rajasthani food festival

5. Shri Thaker Bhojnalay

 

As the name suggests, Shri Thaker Bhojnalay is an authentic Gujarati restaurant that serves the best dishes from the state. You shouldn’t miss out on their refreshing Aamras, tangy Mango Kadhi, delicious Puran Poli and the wholesome Gujarati Thali.

 

Where: 31, Dadisheth Agyari Lane, Off Kalbadevi Road, Kalbadevi, Mumbai
Cost for Two: INR 1000 (approximately)
Contact: 022 22069916

dabeli gujarati food street food

Photo Credit: Instragram handle of sivakumarvenkatachalam

6. Aaswad

 

If you are looking for a typical Maharashtrian experience, then Aaswad does the job for you. Although it also serves South Indian and street food, but it is majorly known for Maharashtrian delicacies. It serves some of the best varieties of Misal Pav, Kothimbir Vadi, Thalipeeth, Sabudana Khichdi, and Patal Bhaji.

 

Where: LJ Road, Shivaji Park, Gadkari Chowk, Dadar Shivaji Park, Mumbai
Cost for Two: INR 200 (approximately)
Contact: 022 24451871

maharashtrian

7. Gonguura

 

If you are a South Indian food lover, Gonguura is the place to be. It serves the best Andhra dishes. This quaint little restaurant has some amazing Pesarattu Dosas, Onion Uttapams, Andhra Meals, Gonguura Pickles and Mirapakaya Bajjis.

 

Where: 5/6, Juhu Ekta Co-operative Housing Society, Juhu Versova Link Road, Juhu, Mumbai
Cost for Two: INR 700 (approximately)
Contact: 8828070480

methi uttapam

8. SpiceKlub

 

SpiceKlub is known for presenting famous North Indian dishes in a unique way with a touch of molecular gastronomy like the Pav Bhaji Fondue, Paneer Cigar Roll and the Cheesy Garlic Naan.

 

Where: 8A, Janta Industrial Estate, Opposite Phoenix Mills, Senapati Bapat Road, Lower Parel, Mumbai
Cost for Two: INR 1500 (approximately)
Contact: 022 46104610

pav bhaji

9. Ovenfresh

 

Ovenfresh serves a mix of Italian, Mexican and Mediterranean dishes that are definitely worth a try. The menu boasts of an interesting mix of Minestrone Soup, Broccoli Soup, Mushroom Risotto, Corn and Cheese Enchiladas, English Cheddar Quesadillas and an irresistible variety of desserts including freshly baked waffles and creamy pannacottas.

 

Where: Kiran Building, Ranade Road, Dadar Shivaji Park, Mumbai
Cost for Two: INR 1200 (approximately)
Contact: 022 67600000

quesadillas

The amazing food that these restaurants offer will compel you to visit them whether or not you are a vegetarian.

 

Sev: The Crunchy Besan Snack That We Can't Do Without

The melting point of culture, heritage and history, Gujarat, impressed me the most with its lavish vegetarian spread. If India has earned global recognition for its rich range of vegetarian delicacies, Gujarat with its extravagant vegetarian fare has a lot to contribute to the fame. And one particular Gujarati dish has become my favourite. It is none other than their popular Sev-Tamatar Ki Sabzi. My love affair with sev didn’t end here. As I strolled down the streets, I spotted the crunchy delicacy in several snacks like Bhelpuris, Dabeli and Raj Kachoris.

 

In the book, ‘The Historical Dictionary of Indian food’ by renowned food historian KT Acharya, he reveals that the term ‘sev’ was first mentioned in the ‘Manasollasa’ a 12th century book compiled by King Someshwara, but probably the origin of the snack is much older. He writes, “Sev is the term for crisp-fried noodles of besan flour, extruded either thick or thin from a batter.”

 Sev: The Crunchy Besan Snack That We Can't Do Without

 

Sev is a noodle-like crispy snack made of gram flour or chickpea flour typically seasoned with turmeric and ajwain (carom seeds) before being deep-fried. The thickness varies from preparation to preparation. Sev is used in several Indian dishes and snacks as a main ingredient or mostly as a crispy garnish. Ratlami Sev from Ratlam in Madhya Pradesh, made from cloves and chickpea flour, is a renowned sev variety across the country.

 

Chef Sadaf Hussain, a contestant of Master Chef India in 2016, “Some say that the name ‘sev’ comes from ‘siv’ (thread) referring to sewing. Sev is one of India’s most popular munching snack. Some of these are spicy and thick, while others are very fine and unseasoned. Sev is quite famous in Indore, Ratlam, Bikaner and Gujarat.”

 

“Sev is very versatile. You can have it by itself or mix it on top of any street food or chaat and it will just elevate the flavour and texture of the dish. If you travel around Gujarat and Mumbai, you will find many different snacks that use sev. For instance, the Sev Puri, Ragda Patties, Dabeli Chaat and Katori Chaat. All of them will be incomplete without a sprinkling of sev. If you go up North towards Delhi and Jaipur, you’ll find chaat items like Raj Kachori, Pani Puri, Sev Puri and Aalo Chaat decorated with sev. In Madhya Pradesh, you will find locals relishing on Sev Poha or a snack of peanuts with sev,” he adds.

bhel puri

Chef Gurpreet Singh from Punjab Grill shares, “Different states like adding a their own twist to a the snack, say for instance, a Maharashtrian Sev Puri would use garlic chutney, while in North India people like to add potatoes to their Sev Puri while in Punjab, we add chickpeas.”

 

There are small manual machines available to make sev where you can feed the batter and it can help you extract uniformly fine sev. If you are making sev at home, make sure the oil is hot otherwise the sev won’t come out as crunchy. According to Chef Gurpreet, mustard oil are the best to fry your sev. Add a hint of spices like cloves, carom seeds and cayenne pepper to the batter to give it a spicy edge.

 

Here’s a lovely recipe of Sev ki Sabzi, you can try at home.

 

Sev ki Sabji
Recipe by Chef Aditya Bal

sev sabzi

Ingredients Of Sev Ki Sabji

  • 1/2 a cup of ghee
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 2 medium onions, julienne
  • 1/2 inch ginger, chopped
  • 2 green chilies, chopped
  • 1 tsp turmeric powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp red chili powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp coriander powder
  • 2 large potatoes, diced into cubes
  • 1 large daikon radish, diced into cubes
  • 4 tsp fresh yoghurt
  • 1 large cup of moti sev
  • 1 cup of water
  • 1 lime
  • A handful of fresh coriander, chopped
  •  Salt to taste

How to Make Sev ki Sabji

 

1. Crackle the cumin seeds in hot ghee, add in the onions and saute for two minutes.

 

2. Add in the ginger and the green chilies, fry together with the onions for 5-7 minutes on a medium flame.

 

3. Mix in the turmeric powder, the red chilli powder, and coriander powder.

 

4. Deglaze the pan with a little water, Add salt and let the masala cook uncovered, on medium heat, for 7-8 minutes.

 

5. Add in the diced potatoes and radish, mix well.

 

6. Add half a cup of water, cover and let cook on a low flame for 15 minutes or till the vegetables are tender.

 

7. Stir in the fresh yoghurt, and continue cooking on a medium flame for 2 minutes.

 

8. Add in the moti sev, stir well to coat the sev with the masala.

 

9. Add in 3/4th of a cup of water, and let the sev ki sabji cook uncovered for 5-7 minutes.

 

10. Garnish with fresh coriander, and the juice of a lime

Plant-Based Protein, a Reason to Let Go of Meat

With the world moving towards a more harmonious existence with the environment, it becomes imperative that our food habits must change too. Consumption of meat, processed foods, or year around foods are not just factors that harm our health but they contribute to creating an ecological imbalance, as reported by various studies. So what’s gaining popularity amidst this fight for sustainable and better living are plant-based proteins. Call it a new food trend, this category of food is fast making its way into the culinary world, gaining more attention in the recent months.

With an abundance of plant based protein sources like chickpeas, soy, beans etc vegetarianism is rising steadily too. An alternative to dairy and animal protein, plant protein claim a lower carbon footprint on the environment. It’s a category of protein that is obtained from plants and provides all the essential nine amino acids that the body requires.

Plant-Based Protein, a Reason to Let Go of Meat

Plant proteins are said to have a more positive impact on the body since they come without additional saturated fats and other harmful trans fats that could be dangerous in the long run. Plant foods as compared to animal foods are richer in antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and other micronutrients that the body needs for its proper functioning. Thus, plant protein sources contain phytochemicals that fortify the body against illnesses.

 

In a bid to become more sensitive towards the environment, one such attempt has been made by Canada. These include certain additions and eliminations to renew the current food guidelines. With a decision to eliminate diary and meat products, it aims to promote a healthy regimen that ensures nutritious intake of food and to discard food that is rich in saturated fats, sodium and sugar-based beverages.

 

Some of the sources of plant-based proteins include soy, lentils, pulses, nuts, seeds, quinoa, ancient grains like millet, etc.

 

Soups For Monsoons: 5 Ways to Drive Away the Chill and Stay Strong

One look at the stormy showers outside the window, and the thought of piping hot pakodas, samosas and a hot cup of tea comes to mind almost instantly. And why not, after sweating it out for two months, binging on crunchy fried delicacies seems like the reward we all deserve and had been waiting for. But sadly, the damp weather also makes one susceptible to several diseases associated with the monsoon season like cold and flu, throat infections and tummy problems. Your immunity levels tend to be low during seasonal change and your body becomes vulnerable to catch infections. The excess of moisture in the air make it perfect for bacteria and microorganism to breed and this can hamper our ability to process foods and our metabolism tends to slow down. Due to this, our digestion and immunity is compromised severely.

To counter this, you need to fortify yourself from within with the maximum inflow of vitamins. A bowl of piping hot soup can come in handy to make you feel strong and at the same time it offers protection. It keeps your body hydrated and can also be a good source of protein. The flavourful toppings of of garlic, onions, and ginger impart a warm feel and keep you snug as the weather becomes a bit chilly. Talking about the health benefits of having soups, they may help to de-clog your nasal passages and also promote increased secretions which helps in flushing out bacteria and viruses.

Soups For Monsoons: 5 Ways to Drive Away the Chill and Stay Strong

Bangalore-based Nutritionist Dr. Anju Sood tells us, “Our immunity system tends to take a dip during this season. We are more prone to infections and therefore, our bodies need a constant flow of vitamins and minerals. Soups are great ways to load up on all the nutrition. However, I would advise to go for clear soups over the thick cream-based ones.” According to Meher Rajput, Nutritionist at FITPASS, “Mushrooms are loaded with vitamin D and antioxidants which play a role in building your immunity. You can use them in a hot mushroom soup. Also, chicken and mutton soups are good to derive strength as they are high in protein.” Here are a few healthy soup ingredients that you must experiment with.

 

1. Mushrooms: They are full of B Vitamins, Vitamin D and antioxidants. B vitamins have been linked with healthy immune functions. They are also rich in selenium- a mineral touted to alleviate the risk of severe infections. Mushrooms are a great source of proteins as they contain all 17 essential amino acids required by the body.

 

2. Meat and Fish: Whether it’s chicken, mutton or fish and seafood, all of them are rich in protein. Not only does our body need protein to build and repair its tissues, but it also plays a vital role in boosting white blood cells that are responsible for fighting infections. Meat also supplies Vitamin B, zinc and iron. Omega-3 fatty acids (from fish and seafoods) is also an essential component in keeping up the body’s defense mechanism.

 

3. Dark and Leafy Vegetables: Leafy greens like cabbage, spinach and broccoli are high in vitamins A, C and E, as well as folate, antioxidants and fibre. Try and include them in soups with a hint of aromatic spices.

 

4. Spices: Load up on immunity boosting and anti-inflammatory spices like turmeric, mustard, asafoetida (hing), coriander, turmeric, fenugreek (methi), cloves, pepper, cinnamon, garlic, ginger and curry leaves. They not only add a fresh flavour to your soups, but also boost your immunity and aid digestion.

 

Here are few interesting soup recipes you can try at home this monsoon.

 

1. Spiced Spinach Soup with Cottage Cheese Croutons Recipe
Recipe by Chef Vicky Ratnani

 

A good old spinach soup loaded with the goodness of fenugreek leaves, mustard seeds, turmeric powder and topped with crispy cottage cheese croutons.

spinach soup 625

2. Bhutte Ka Shorba
Recipe by Chef Kunal Kapoor

 

A nutritious and wholesome stew, packed with the season’s favourite – corn and a whole lot of aromatic spices.

bhutte ka shorba

Bhutte Ka Shorba

3.Seared Mushrooms and Chicken Broth Recipe
Recipe By Chef Jaydeep Mukherjee

 

A sumptuous broth made with the goodness of chicken and a great variety of mushrooms – button, shiitake, shimeji, enoki, and chanterelle. Wholesome and satisfying.

mushroom broth

4.Tibettan Chicken Broth
Recipe by Chef Aditya Bal

 

An authentic Tibetan broth, made with succulent chicken pieces simmered in a flavourful broth with fresh vegetables and spices.

chicken soup

5.Chimney Soup
Recipe By Chef Andy Sharma

 

Easy and quick to prepare, this soul-stirrer is a must try. It makes for an ideal light supper with the goodness chicken, fish and spinach.

chimney soup

Make these soups fresh at home and enjoy them on a chilly evening. Aren’t these the simple pleasures of life?

 

7 New Fried Desserts to Enjoy While The Monsoon Season Lasts

While the rain makes the weather breezy and beautiful, it also comes with an intense craving for fried foods. The change in weather prompts a change in our menu with summery snacks giving way to inventive and innovative fried food items. But why should we restrict ourselves to tea time savouries? There’s a lot out there to satisfy your sweet tooth too. The magnificent monsoon lends itself to a rainbow of the most delicious fried desserts. Crisp on the outside, moist and sweet on the inside, these desserts will leave you drooling and tempt you to run to your kitchen. Here’s a list of 8 unusual fried desserts that will satisfy your cravings instantly.

7 New Fried Desserts to Enjoy While The Monsoon Season Lasts

1. Chocolate Jalebi 

 

As the weather shifts from the scorching heat to pleasant skies, we all get that tingly feeling in our tummies craving for something hot and crispy. Since we’re surrounded by tons of sweets, how do we pick which dessert would be perfect for the season? It is next to impossible to resist the chocolate jalebi! A lovely combination of your favourite fried Indian dessert jalebi and chocolate.

How To Make: Add a cup of flour, one tablespoon baking soda, a cup of water and a little bit of color (orange) in a bowl, mix it well and pour it into a frying pan to make jalebis with the help of a cheesecloth. Once they’re ready, dip them in a bowl of melted chocolate and serve hot.

 

2.  Fried Ice-Cream

The epitome of soul food – ice-cream! Admit it or not, we all have a soft corner for ice-cream in our hearts. This time around, try the fried ice-cream. You are sure to get addicted.

How To Make: Scoop 6-8 balls of vanilla ice-cream and freeze it further for an hour. After freezing, dip the balls in whipped egg whites one by one and further cover them with some crushed biscuits. Deep fry the ice-cream and enjoy.

 

3. Deep Fried Cookie Dough

 

Deep fried cookie dough is one of the best fried desserts you could have asked for. Cookies always manage to lift our mood and trust us, fried cookie dough is even better. Every single bite will leave you craving for more.

How to Make: Add 1 stick of butter, ½ cup of brown sugar, 2 tablespoon granulated sugar, 1 tsp vanilla extract, 1 egg, 1 ¼ cup all purpose flour, ½ tsp salt, 1 cup milk and lots of chocolate chips in a bowl to make the cookie dough. Mix them well to make cookie batter and leave it to freeze for an hour. For frying, coat the cough dough balls with corn flakes or bread crumbs and fry away.

 

4. Banana Balls

 

The great part about bananas is that they can be eaten with or without experimentation. To add a quirky twist to the fruit, we can fry the bananas pieces. Banana balls serve as the perfect snack for your evening coffee or tea.

How To Make: Cut bananas into small pieces and mix it with brown sugar to make a paste. Add a little bit of flour, cardamom powder, desiccated coconut powder and baking soda and coat the bananas with this mix. Make little balls and fry them for tea-time.

5. Cake Fries

What could be better than sizzling and crispy French fries? Well, nothing really but now you can enjoy fries for dessert! These fries are made with ingredients that are used to bake a cake. This is probably one of the most unusual and inventive desserts that can be served at your weekend gathering. Serve them with a dark chocolate dip or plain maple syrup.

How To Make: Add 3 eggs, 2 cups of milk, ¼ cup of granulated sugar, 3 cups of all-purpose flour, 2 teaspoon baking powder, ½ teaspoon salt. Whisk everything together for a smooth batter. Add the batter to a funnel with a large hole in order to make funnel cake strands and fry these strands to have the yummy cake fries!

6. Fried Chocolate and Coconut Modak

Sweet dumplings but covered with chocolate? Now, that sounds exquisite. Usually, modak is eaten during festivals keeping us away from it for a long time. To satisfy your needs, this famous Indian dessert can now be made with a chocolaty twist.

How To Cook: Take a bowl and saute one cup of shredded coconut for about 7-8 minutes. In a separate bowl, melt ¼ cup of milk and chocolate side by side. Once its melted, add the chocolate to shredded coconut and keep it aside. For the batter, take a bowl and add 1 cup all-purpose flour, ¼ cup of wheat flour, ¼ cup of suji, ½ cup of milk, 1 tsp oil, and a pinch of salt for tasting. Mix all of them together to make the dough and keep them aside for 20 minutes. Roll little puris, fill the chocolate and coconut mix in the center and shape them like a modak (tear-drop shaped) which can then be deep fried and enjoyed.

 

7. Fried Donut Holes

 

Donuts have been around for years. They are a beloved American snack but are enjoyed all over the world. These donut holes originate from donuts – the portion that is cut out to make the rings. These sweet treats can be easily made at home if one is in the mood to experiment!

How To Make: In a bowl, add 2 cups of all-purpose flour, 3 tablespoon sugar, 1 tablespoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon salt, 5 tablespoon cold butter, and ¾ cups of milk. Whisk them together to make a smooth batter. Make little balls and fry them into a pan. Once they’re out of the pan, roll them in a bowl of sugar. You can even glaze them if you like and serve with jam or caramel sauce.

 

8. Apple Fritters

 

This fruity dessert that can easily satisfy your sugar cravings. This dessert gives you everything that you are looking for to enjoy the nippy weather. They are best served warm and crispy and give you a beautiful fruity taste.

How To Make: In a large bowl, whisk together 2 cups of flour, ¼ cups of granulated sugar, 2 ¼ baking powder and 1 teaspoon of salt. In another bowl, whisk together ¾ cups of milk, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoon butter and ½ tsp vanilla. Gently fold the milk mixture into the flour mixture. Cut the apples into circular slices and dip them in the batter. Fry them in a pan for a few minutes and enjoy the hot and crispy fritters!
Alright, we know you’re already tempted to try them. So, get going.

Bengali Sweet Paradise in Delhi's CR Park: 3 Must-Visit Places

Bengali cuisine is one of the most versatile cuisines in the melting pot of unique regional dishes that every state in India offers. Trying to find something authentic away from the homeland is always difficult, but there’s a Bengali hub in Delhi that recreates similar magic and will not leave you disappointed. Whether it is a subtle fish curry or a fried mutton cutlet or a soothing sweet treat, Delhi has learnt to relish and embrace the innate bengali-ness of all these dishes. You may have heard of the Bengali paradise by now and if you haven’t it exists in Delhi’s Chittranjan Park (CR Park). You’ll find everything here, from Kolkata’s famous street foods like puchka to the all-time favourite mishti doiand everything in between. For now, we’ll try to satisfy the sweet spot on our tongue.

Bengali Sweet Paradise in Delhi's CR Park: 3 Must-Visit Places
The first sweet shop is the beloved Annapurna Sweets

, which happens to be very famous for its Rosogullas and Mishti Doi. Every time you pass it, you can smell the sweet fragrance of sugar in the air. We suggest you try their Kheer Kodom which is a khoya dumpling stuffed with a rasgulla!

Your next stop should be Kamala Sweets

. We recommend the Sandesh here. They have a wide variety of Sandesh to choose from which also includes flavours like strawberry and chocolate giving a modern twist to the traditional one. We absolutely loved the Jal Bhara Sandesh that was perfect for people who do not like their desserts too sweet. The unusual litchi-flavoured Sandesh was definitely an interesting one out of the whole lot we tasted.

kamala sweets

 

Finally, you must not leave without paying a visit to Rasoraj Sweets

. We found this while looking for ‘shingaras’ which is a Bengali version of a samosa that also has a sweet variety. The shingara was good, but the rosogulla here is the recommended sweet. It is different because of the use of jaggery, the famous ‘Nolen Gur’ from Bengal and is also available in a baked variety which is essentially a baked rasgulla frozen with rasmalai.  

Also, their crisp kachori is the perfect way to start an evening (especially if you are grabbingchaifrom the nearby Raju Da’s Singing Tree).

Being foodies with a sweet tooth, we have hunted down many sweet shops but nothing beats the Bengali treasure that we happened to have stumbled upon in Chittranjan Park.

Feed The Cold, Starve The Fever: Should You Follow This Advise?

Historically, medical practitioners believed that during a fever, the body must not be fed simply because it will direct its energy towards digestion rather than ways to fight off the fever, eventually leading to worsening your symptoms. This popular advise seems to have originated during the late 1500s, when it was assumed that a fever could be cured by fasting while a person suffering from cold must be fed because it occurs due to a drop in the body temperature.

Over the years, with numerous scientific studies that prove the phrase as inadequate and problematic, we have come to terms with the fact that starving a fever may not be a solution and could be potentially dangerous.

Feed The Cold, Starve The Fever: Should You Follow This Advise?

In line with common experiences, whenever we are suffering from fever, a visit to the doctor often concludes with an assertion to drink plenty of water in order to keep yourself hydrated and also eat lots of fruits and vegetables to replace the lost nutrients from the body. To prevent weakness, the body requires essential salts and fluids.

625 fever

Photo Credit: IStock

What you must do

We’ve grown up hearing “prevention is better than cure” and rightly so. Our immunesystem must be strengthened with antioxidants and foods that are rich in Vitamin C and Vitmain E that contribute to the healthy state of our body. Foods that are extremely rich in bioflavonoids must be eaten on a regular basis. These are found in yellow colored foods like lemons and bananas.

During a fever, the overheated state of the body burns more calories than usual and the metabolism becomes faster. This burden’s the body with an energy demand and thus, we must be sensitive to that. Therefore, it can be fatal to starve oneself during a virus.

vitamin c 620

Photo Credit: IStock

Even more crucial than eating is the need to drink. Sweating during a fever is a common process and it can lead to dehydration and fainting spells. A number of people complain of a loss of appetite and this maybe due to the fact that the body is involved in fighting off the pathogens and uses its energy for that.

Drink as many fluids as you can, a simple mixture of salt and sugar in water provides instant energy. Water enables the body to fight off the toxins with ease, facilitating the road to recovery. Incorporate rice and oats  in your diet, they enable healing. Adding garlic to your diet immensely improves the body’s fighting mechanism due to the antioxidants present in garlic. To combat high temperatures, warm milk with honey and saffron also does wonders.

Fact or fiction?

Next time you encounter somebody rendering these words of wisdom, kindly think twice and first, consult your doctor, before you decide anything for yourself. According to Nutritionist Dr. Simran Saini, starving yourself during fever is the worst thing that you can do. “It can lead to fainting. We usually suggest fluids that are rich in electrolytes. The patient must have shikanjee, lemonade and chhach. During a fever, the body is involved in burning energy and thus food, in the form of fluids is easy to digest and provides that extra dose of  energy that you crucially need. “Light foods like khichdi, dal and rice or porridge is recommended as they are easy to digest.”

chana dal

By fueling your body with nutritious food, you prevent the spread of bacteria. It can be hard to separate fact from fiction and therefore, the best thing to do is to visit your nearest doctor for advice.

9 Interesting Food Festivals You Can Attend This Monsoon in Delhi-NCR

The best way to enjoy the lovely weather during monsoons is to indulge in some good food. So, here’s a list of some of the upcoming food festivals offering interesting, exciting and unique experience for all the foodies out there. Whether you feel like learning a new skill or trying a new cuisine, there’s a lot on offer.

9 Interesting Food Festivals You Can Attend This Monsoon in Delhi-NCR

1. Paint and Vineyard

 

Feel artistic? Then, spend your Sunday afternoon recreating some of the masterpieces at Dirty Apron (The Piano Man). Spread over 3 hours, this event can be enjoyed with friends, family or can be a way to meet new people while learning a new skill. Enjoy your afternoon painting along with some great wine, sangria and delicious pizzas.

 

When: 16th July’17 – Pablo Picasso Collage and Acrylic on Canvas Board, 23rd July’17 – Georgia O’Keeffe with Acrylic on Canvas Board, 30th July’17 – Van Gogh with Acrylic on Canvas Board with Palette Knife Technique

 

Where: B-6 Commercial Complex, Safdarjung Enclave, Opposite Deer Park, Hauz Khas, Delhi

 

Time: 3 P.M. to 6 P.M.

 

Cost: INR 3000 per head: Pizza, Sangria, Beer and all the painting supplies, INR 200 per head: Pizza and all the painting supplies, INR 1800 per head: Painting supplies (All-inclusive of taxes)

food festPhoto Credit: Dirty Apron

2. Great India Beer Festival

What’s better than a beer festival to celebrate the seasonal downpour? Get ready to try beer in all its forms and brews as The Great Indian Beer festival brings hundreds of real ales, craft beers and ciders from renowned microbreweries in Delhi-NCR under one roof. The event will also be some great cafes and street food joints to pair your brews with. While enjoying live music, you can also test your skill on a variety of traditional Beer games.

 

When: 19-20 August

 

Where: Jawahar Lal Nehru Stadium, Lodhi Road, New Delhi-03

 

Time: 2pm – 11pm

 

Cost: 1 Day entry: INR 700, 2 Day entry: INR 1,000. Prices may vary.

beer festivalPhoto Credit: Istock

3. Rajasthani Food Festival

If you craving some spicy food, the New Town Cafe at Park Plaza is where you should head this monsoon. They are all set to take you through a royal culinary journey of Rajasthan. They have an array of quintessential favorites like Gatte ki Subzi, Dal Bati Churma, Ker Sangari, Bajrey ki roti and much more.

 

When: 13 to 23 july

 

Where: Hotel Park Plaza, Gurugram

 

Time: Lunch: 12:30P.M to 3P.M, Dinner: 9 P.M to 10:30P.M

 

Cost: INR 999 per head (plus all applicable taxes), INR 1099 per head (plus all applicable taxes)

rajasthani food festivalPhoto Credit: Istock

4. Organic Food Festival

This month-long event is to let people explore different cuisines and dishes all made with organic ingredients. The organic menu by Chef Noah is globally inspired including Indian fusion dishes. He will ensure that the food served is 100% chemical-free, preservative-free, and pesticide-free. Dive into a roasted beetroot tartare with mint and a salted jaggery drizzle, followed by chimichurri chicken skewers with roasted red peppers and cumin hummus. For main course, you can choose from infused roasted eggplant with sliced potato stacks or bok choy zucchini and squash with organic soy, peanut, ginger, and sesame.

 

When: Starts from 15th July

 

Where: The hungry Monkey. B 6/6 DDA Market, Safdarjung Enclave, Opp. Deer Park New Delhi, India

 

Time: 12 P.M to 1 A.M.

zucchiniPhoto Credit: Hungry Monkey

5. Feast of the Seven Kingdoms

Many of you have been part of the Game of Thrones family for six seasons, experiencing the stunning visuals and being engulfed in the storm of heartbreak and revenge. To welcome the seventh season, Science and Cooking is organizing a feast that takes you on a culinary journey through the halls of King’s Landing to the warm comfort foods of the north and to the rich sumptuous treats of the east. It’ll be a hands-on cooking workshop where you can learn the secrets of the kitchens of the seven kingdoms, create your own bloody sauces, carve our own meats or prepare our own rustic feast and recreate this magical world for yourselves!

 

When: 22 Jul 2017 6:00 PM

 

Where: Science and Cooking, Gurugram

 

Time: 6 P.M.

 

Cost: INR 2000 (inclusive of taxes)

got themed festivalPhoto Credit: Facebook/Science and Cooking

6. Street Food Festival

 

During the monsoon season, it is tough to resist the urge to dig into the tempting street food and you don’t have to! Enjoy some amazing street food delights from around the country under one roof. You will find the glorious Aloo Tikki from Lucknow, Tawa Aloo Chaat from Old Delhi, the tangy and chatpata Moong Dal Pakodi from Uttar Pradesh, along with Akki Roti from Karnataka, the famous Bhel Puri from the by-lanes of Mumbai and the authentic spicy Lakhanpur de Bhalle from Jammu Kashmir.

 

When: 1st August to 31st August 2017

 

Where: Plaza Premium Lounge, Domestic Departures, Delhi,

 

Cost: Lounge access starts at INR 1200 plus taxes

street food festivalPhoto Credit: Plaza Premium Lounge

7. Masaledar Monsoon

To satisfy your monsoon cravings, indulge in masaledaar delicacies and chatpata thirst quencher. Drool over delectable dishes including Biryani Pakodas, Poatleez, Tundla Station Cutlets, Raincoat Chicken, and Barsati Mutton Pepper Fry along with refreshing drinks like Kaala Khatta, Hi with Chai, Setting Chai, Mad Over Mango and many more.

 

When: Till 30th July 2017

 

Where: Kopper Kadai, J2/6B, 1st & 2nd Floor, B.K. Dutta Market, Rajouri Garden, New Delhi

 

Time: 12 noon to 11pm

 

Cost: INR 1400 (Meal for two)

masaledar monsoonPhoto Credit: Kopper Kadai

8. Thai Street Affair

‘Siam Jan Deaw’ at Thai Pavilion is an interesting Thai street food festival where the menu incorporates an exclusive array of one-bowl delicacies from the vibrant streets of Siam. Here’s a chance to savour popular delicacies from the streets of Thailand from their curated menu and enjoy some authentic Thai flavours this monsoon.

 

When: 14 to 23 July, 2017

 

Where: Thai Pavilion at Vivanta by Taj ,Gurugram

thai food festivalPhoto Credit: Thai Pavilion

9. The Burger Fest

It’s time to celebrate the most favorite food of all time. Yes, burgers! Café Yell has organized a burger festival to satisfy all your burger cravings. They’re definitely going to be some of the most exciting burgers around town all under one roof.

 

When: 13th to 25th July 2017

 

Where: CafeYell, 35,Defence colony mkt New Delhi India 110024

 

Time: 8 am onwards

burger fest